Remote-Work Boom During Covid-19 Pandemic Draws Real-Estate Startups

Park in San Francisco social distancingDavid Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A group of real-estate startups is aiming to cash in on the remote-work phenomenon.

With many corporate offices closed because of the pandemic, many young professionals have left cities like New York and San Francisco for warmer, cheaper places. A number still plan to return after their offices reopen, leaving them reluctant to buy homes or sign long-term apartment leases.

That situation is creating fresh demand for furnished housing on a short-term basis, a fast-growing niche that many property startups and their venture-capital backers are rushing to fill.

One of them is Landing, which runs a network of furnished apartments across the U.S. When it launched in 2019, the Birmingham, Ala., and San Francisco-based company initially planned to operate in about 30 cities last year. Instead, it expanded to 75, largely because demand grew much faster than expected, said Landing Chief Executive Bill Smith.

“Covid has taken a decade of change that I was thinking was going to happen between now and 2030 and kind of compressed it into a year,” he said.

Legions of remote workers also offer these firms a chance to make up for reduced tourist and corporate business. San Francisco-based Sonder, which rents out furnished apartments by the night, ramped up its marketing of extended stays during the pandemic, according to Chief Executive Francis Davidson. Stays of longer than 14 days now account for about 60% of the company’s business, up from less than a quarter before the pandemic, he said.

Kulveer Taggar, CEO of corporate-housing operator Zeus Living, said his firm experienced a steep drop in demand as companies hit the pause button on employee travel and relocations. But he was able to make up some ground by renting apartments to individuals. People working from home now account for about a quarter of the company’s business, Mr. Taggar said, up from virtually nothing before the pandemic.

Unlike Sonder and Zeus, remote workers were a key part of Landing’s business before the pandemic. Its customers pay an annual membership fee, which gives them the right to rent furnished apartments in any city. The minimum length of stay varies from 30 to 60 days, and the company asks for a month’s notice before a customer moves out.

The company is popular with college-educated young professionals who don’t want to be tied to a single location. Since the start of the pandemic, it has seen a growing number of customers leave New York and San Francisco and move to cities like St. Petersburg, Fla., and Denver, Mr. Smith said.

In November, Landing raised $45 million in venture funding from a group of investors led by Foundry Group and including Greycroft and Maveron, along with $55 million in debt. Mr. Smith said he hopes to expand to 25,000 apartments by the end of this year, up from around 10,000 today.

That growth carries risk if demand from remote workers were to disappear again after the pandemic is over. Still, Chris Moody, a partner at Foundry Group, said the number of furnished apartments available under flexible terms is still so small that he doesn’t worry about a lack of customers.

“Even at the end of 2021, we won’t really have scratched the surface,” he said.

The post Remote-Work Boom During Covid-19 Pandemic Draws Real-Estate Startups appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

Source: realtor.com

The Cost of Off-Campus Rent at Top Colleges

Which university costs more: Harvard, Yale or MIT? It’s relatively easy to compare tuition and even dorm fees — but off-campus housing costs are harder to pin down. They also can make a big difference in the tab for a higher education.

In fact, 80 percent of the towns where elite colleges are located, based on U.S News & World Report’s newly released Best Colleges of 2017, have median rents above the national median of $1,408 a month, according to a new Zillow analysis.

The median rent in Cambridge, MA, where Harvard University and MIT students gravitate for off-campus housing, is $2,594 a month, while Yale University students who live off campus in New Haven, CT, pay just over half that: $1,428 a month.

Those figures don’t account for the size of the rental unit or for roommate situations, but they do reflect the starkly different real estate markets in Cambridge and New Haven.

Although off-campus housing costs might not come into play until sophomore or junior year, they’re worth weighing into the college-cost equation.

InfographicBlogBody

“As students and their parents are filling out applications this fall and are crunching the numbers on financial aid and student loans, they should also factor in cost of housing,” said Jeremy Wacksman, Zillow’s chief marketing officer. “Looking at both on- and off-campus housing prices, and thinking through whether they’ll likely live with roommates or alone, will help them gauge an accurate picture of the student loans and financial aid they will need in order to obtain their degree.”

Beating the Bay Area blues

Housing around Stanford University was the highest among top-ranked colleges. Reflecting the Bay Area’s astronomical housing costs, the median rent in Palo Alto is a whopping $6,139 a month.

However, Stanford houses almost all of its undergraduates in university housing, where they pay about $14,600 for room and board for the school year. Some 60 percent of Stanford’s graduate students live on campus and pay $12,300 for rent plus $5,800 for food.

The university provides a subsidy for the other grad students, so that their cost of living approximates that of students living on campus, according to Lisa Lapin, associate vice president for university communications at Stanford.

Chicago sings a sweeter tune

Most college towns are not as pricey as Palo Alto — and they’re great places to live, according to Peter Cassel. He’s in Hyde Park, the neighborhood adjacent to the University of Chicago, and is director of community development for Mac Properties, the biggest landlord in that neighborhood.

Hyde Park is that rare South Side Chicago neighborhood that’s known for being safe — in part because the university has its own police force.

It also offers a tremendous quality-of-life boost, whether you’re a student or not. “From my perspective, to choose to live in a neighborhood that doesn’t have a large university in it seems crazy,” Cassel said.

He enjoys the people who are attracted to the university. “They create a level of diversity and enthusiasm that is very positive.” And he relishes the amenities that pop up around it. “There’s some sort of music program going on every night of the week. There’s a local neighborhood symphony, a radio station, multiple local theater groups – all of which in some way are supported by the university.”

Mac Properties offers one-bedroom apartments in Hyde Park that start at about $1,200 a month. That’s better than the Chicago median of $1,687 a month — but still higher than South Bend, IN, where the University of Notre Dame is located, and Winston-Salem, NC, which Wake Forest University calls home. Median rents there are $723 and $994, respectively.

Bargains aren’t out of the question

Medians are by definition in the middle, though, which means some students will find deals.

Jessica Dougherty beat the $1,286 median rent in Durham, NC, when she was a graduate student at Duke, No. 8 on the U.S. News and World Report list. She paid just $900 a month for a one-bedroom apartment. It didn’t include Internet or cable, but she did have an in-unit washer and dryer, and was a three-minute bus ride to the building where most of her classes were.

Dougherty graduated last year and moved to a place that costs $1,370 a month. It’s a little farther from work, but the complex has both saltwater and chlorinated pools, plus trash “valets” who pick up garbage at her door at 8 p.m. every night.

Friends are jealous, Dougherty reports, and Durham’s best restaurants and other offerings are just down the street.

Related:

  • Quiz: Can You Match the State With Its Popular Rental Features?
  • Ms. Independent: Top 10 Cities Where Millennials Are Living Alone
  • Leaving the Nest: College Students and Renters Insurance

Source: zillow.com

How to Write a Check (Step by Step Guide to Filling Out a Check)

Writing a check. It’s one of those things you always wanted to know how to do right but were probably too afraid to ask. Well, fear no longer: in this guide, we’ll walk you through the basics of check-writing, from how to fill out the lines you need, to knowing when it’s best to use a check — and when it’s not. We’ve also included a printable practice check at the bottom of the article so you can give it a shot before filling out a real one.

In this article, we’ll cover everything from how to write a check to the best situations to use one. Read through if you want to know everything you need to about writing a check, or click on a link below to jump straight to the section you’re most interested in.

  • What Is a Check?
    • Where Can I Get a Checkbook?
  • How Do You Fill Out a Check?
    • What Do I Do After Writing a Check?
  • Check Writing Security Tips
  • Alternatives to Writing a Check
  • Wrapping up

Before we get into the details of learning how to fill out a check, let’s start with the basics.

What Is a Check?

A check is basically a statement in writing that you agree to pay some amount of money to whomever you’re making the check out to. It lets the bank know that they can withdraw those funds from your financial accounts and direct deposit it into the payee’s account (that’s the person who you’re paying). If you’re unsure about how much to keep in checking for checks you may be writing, check out our post on that for a brief explanation.

When to use a check

Checks are useful in a variety of situations. You can use a check to:

  • Pay your monthly rent
  • Make a large purchase without a card
  • Send money as a gift
  • Pay for groceries
  • Pay for hired work like a housekeeper or gardener

Basically, they’re good for situations where you’re paying large sums of money that wouldn’t be convenient to pay for in cash, and where you’d rather not use a credit or debit card.

Where can I get a checkbook?

You can usually get a checkbook straight from your bank for free or a small fee, and they’re also available from retailers like Costco and Walmart. Custom checks are also available online from sites like Checks.com, but be careful where you order from, as some sites may not be secure — or could even be a scam.

Before you get started making payments with checks, however, you’ll need to know how to fill one out.

How Do You Fill Out a Check?

Knowing how to write a check is pretty easy once you get the hang of it. First, take a look at this graphic that shows the way that all the necessary fields of a check should be filled out.

filling in a check

Next, we’ll walk through each step to make sure you know what goes into filling out each line. We get it — it’s a little nerve racking signing over money to someone on a little piece of paper. Knowing how to fill it out correctly will give you more confidence the next time you have to send a check.

  1. Start with the payee, the person who you’re sending money to. There’s usually text that reads “pay to the order of” beside a line that you’ll fill in. On that line, simply write the first and last name of the person who you’re paying, or the name of the company you’re paying if it’s not an individual person. Be sure that you spell everything correctly, as misspelling a name could result in the check not going through.
  2. Fill in the amount in words that you are paying your payee. This part is a little weird, since you usually write numbers out in numerals, but it’s an important security step. The dollar amount should be written in words, and any cents can be written as a fraction out of 100. For example, if you were paying your landlord $925.50 for rent and utilities, you’d write out “Nine hundred twenty five dollars and 50/100.”
  3. Fill in the amount in numbers in the box on the top right of the check. This is a bit easier. In the case of the example above, you’d just write out $925.50. Often, the dollar sign is already written on the check, so you just have to make sure that the numerals are written out correctly. Important note: be sure that you double-check that the amount you wrote in words matches the amount you wrote in numerals.
  4. The optional memo line is located on the bottom left of the check. Though leaving this blank won’t invalidate the check, it’s usually smart to include a brief description so that your payee knows what the money is for. For example, in the rent check example, including “September rent” on the memo line is a good way for you and your landlord to keep track of your rent payments.
  5. The date is on the top right of the check. Fill in the date of the day you fill out the check — this ensures that you and your recipient can keep track of when the payment occurred.
  6. Sign your check on the line on the bottom right. This line shows that you have officially agreed to pay the listed amount. Be sure that the name you sign matches the one on file with your bank or the check may not be valid. It’s also a good idea to have a consistent signature, that way there’s little doubt you’ve authorized the check.

That’s it! That’s all it takes to know how to fill out a check. If you need a little practice filling out a check before you’re ready to send one, try out our printable practice check.

Note: In addition to the parts that you’ll fill in, a check includes the routing number and account number for the bank account that it’s withdrawing from. You don’t need to worry about those when you learn how to write a check, but when you receive your checkbook, be sure to double check that the number match your bank. You want to know which bank account your check will be drawing from when it’s cashed.

What Do I Do After Writing a Check?

Once you’ve written the check, make sure to note in a check register the amount that you’ve paid. Check registers are often included in the backs of checkbooks, but you can also keep a separate one if that is more convenient for you.

Whether you use a paper register or a digital one, it’s important to record how much you’ve paid because, until your payee cashes the check and it’s processed at your bank, your account will still list those funds as available. Recording the amount that you’ve paid gives you a more accurate picture of the amount that is in your checking account, and will be necessary when it’s time to balance your checkbook.

Note: Making sure to track cash and checks is always an important way to stay on your budget. While you will likely be able to see your credit card purchases online as soon as they happen, checks and cash don’t leave as easy a trail. Maintaining a written log and using an app like Mint are helpful ways to keep an eye on the full picture of your spending as you wait for checks to clear.

Check Writing Security Tips

Because checks are physical pieces of paper, they aren’t password protected and aren’t as easy to track as electronic payments (more on that in the next section). So, there are some security risks that you should keep in mind if you plan on using your checkbook.

Check writing security basics

That said, checks are generally a secure way of paying for things if they’re filled out carefully and properly. Check out these tips before filling out your check to ensure that you aren’t scammed or defrauded.

  • Never leave a check blank. There’s a reason signing your check was the last step listed above. If you sign a check and hand it over without a dollar amount specified, your payee can simply enter whatever quantity they wish and withdraw that from your bank account. The same goes for the payee line. If you had a signed check made out for $500 without a payee, and it slipped out of your bag, anyone could pick it up, enter their name, and pay themselves. Be sure that you always wait until you know the dollar amount and payee before you sign your check.
  • Use a pen. For the same reasons you wouldn’t want to hand anyone a blank check, it’s a good idea to use pen when filling it out. A check written in pencil could be easily tampered with, so be sure your writing is clear and permanent to avoid check fraud.
  • Try out the line method. Following the same reasoning, you wouldn’t want someone to turn your check for $500 into a check for $5500. You can prevent this by drawing a line from the edge of the space where you’ve written the amount to the start of your first letter. Follow this up by filling the entire numerical quantity box with the numerals for your amount.
  • Keep a record. Whether you opt for a checkbook that makes carbon copies of every check you write, or simply record all your transactions in a check register, keeping a handy list of all your paid checks is a good way to make sure you notice if something goes wrong. It’s also just helpful when you’re trying to sort out how much money you’ve spent and what you’ve spent it on.

Checks are generally a secure way to pay for things, but they might not be your best option for every situation.

Alternatives to writing a check

Alternatives to Writing a Check

Writing a check might be a useful way to make a payment in some situations, but in today’s world of tech, card payments and online banking, there’s often an easier and more secure alternative to pay or transfer funds.

Check alternatives

Here are some situations where you might use a check along with some alternatives that could be a better option.

  • Paying rent. There are plenty of landlords who keep things old school and only accept checks. However, many contemporary apartment complexes or apartments owned by property management companies will invest in an online payment portal for their residents. If you have the option to set up a payment portal, this is a much safer way of paying rent — plus, it eliminates the cost and hassle of mailing a check.
  • Making a large purchase. Credit cards are scary, but they often are a much better way of making large purchases. This is because many credit cards offer perks like cash back or airline miles, and consistently paying off your balance can seriously boost your credit. Plus, credit cards have stronger fraud protection than checks.
  • Buying groceries. Credit cards are also a great option here. Many grocery stores, or retailers that also sell groceries, offer credit cards themselves. These can be used to gain points or discounts, lowering your grocery bill monthly.

Wrapping up

Knowing how to write a check can be a handy and secure way to pay for something if you do it correctly. The guidelines in this post should help you start writing checks safely and carefully, and if you need a little extra practice, try out our printable practice check below. It’s a good way to feel confident before you put your pen (never pencil!) on the next check you write.

Blank check

 

The post How to Write a Check (Step by Step Guide to Filling Out a Check) appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

Hottest Apartment Amenities to Look for in 2020

The competition for your apartment rental dollars is HOT! To get renters’ business, property management companies try to “wow” prospective tenants. Many rental properties try doing this by designing apartment complexes with the top amenities in the industry! Apartments with an in-unit washer and dryer? Increasingly common nowadays. Apartments with yards? You can find them […]

The post Hottest Apartment Amenities to Look for in 2020 appeared first on Apartment Life.

Source: blog.apartmentsearch.com

Moving to Las Vegas: Everything You Need to Know

There’s so much culture and diversity to embrace in fabulous Las Vegas. Despite it being known as the “City of Lost Wages,” there are a lot of opportunities when moving to Las Vegas.

The cost of living has stayed fairly low and it isn’t too crowded, especially when compared to other large urban areas. But it might not stay that way forever. Many California residents are packing up and moving here where they can afford a higher lifestyle at a fraction of the price.

So, don’t waste any time deciding if moving to Las Vegas makes sense for you. The city is expanding and you’ll want to take advantage of the growth sooner rather than later. Here’s what you need to know.

las vegas nv

Las Vegas overview

As one of the most famous cities in the world, you’ve probably heard a fair share about Las Vegas. You maybe even visited once or twice. But what you hear about and experience on a vacation is vastly different than living here.

The locals don’t hit the Strip every night and party non-stop. In fact, in many parts of Vegas, you’ll find quiet, family-friendly neighborhoods. Due to the reasonable cost of living, this city is rapidly growing into a desirable destination.

  • Population: 651,319
  • Population density (people per square mile): 4,298.2
  • Median income: $53,575
  • Studio average rent: $778
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,236
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,454
  • Cost of living index: 105.7

las vegas nv

Popular neighborhoods in Las Vegas

Not all of fabulous Las Vegas is lights and excitement. Each neighborhood has its own quirks and perks. Whether you’re a young professional that’s starting out on your own or you’ve got a family, there’s a neighborhood suited just for you.

  • Summerlin: Summerlin has lots of community events like farmers markets and free activities. There’s plenty of shopping and great restaurants and it’s only about a 20-minute drive to the Strip. It’s also one of the safest communities in the city,
  • Downtown: Downtown Las Vegas was big before the Strip came along and stole the show. You’ll find lots of great restaurants and eclectic vintage shops here!
  • Centennial Hills: This suburb is known to have a little more of a “rural” vibe (or at least, as rural as it can get in a big city like Vegas). Many people who own horses choose to live in this area for the ample space it offers. It’s family-friendly and has lots of outdoor spaces like parks and splash pads for kids to enjoy on those hot summer days.
  • Arts District: Hipsters flock to The Arts District to experience the best aspects of the city without the typical over-the-top Las Vegas flair. As its name suggests, it’s full of art, along with fun second-hand and vintage stores. It was even dubbed the “least Vegas neighborhood in Vegas” by The New York Times. So, even though it’s right there near the Strip, it’s a completely different world.
  • North Cheyenne: Located near the Las Vegas airport, North Cheyenne is very convenient for anyone who travels frequently. It’s a quieter part of town and is more of a suburb, but it’s really affordable and reasonably safe in comparison to other parts of Vegas.

The pros of moving to Las Vegas

There’s no doubt that you’ll enjoy living in Las Vegas. While daily life as a resident isn’t quite as fun and exciting as a weekend getaway, there are still plenty of positive aspects of living in the city.

las vegas strip

You’ll never be bored

Much of Las Vegas is open 24 hours, so you’ll be able to do most of what you want at any point in the day. You can always access areas of the Strip and Downtown with shows, shopping, bars and clubs, many of which offer discounts to the locals. Or, you can enjoy the endless shopping and new restaurants around town. There’s also surprisingly great outdoor recreation at Mount Charleston (you can even ski there in the winter) and Valley of Fire. You can even go boating at Lake Mead.

It’s a traveler’s paradise

One of the perks of living in a city that people from every corner of the globe visit is that you have access to an international airport that has daily flights to almost anywhere in the world. If you prefer to drive, you’re between three and four hours away from Los Angeles and Anaheim — many Las Vegas residents get season passes to Disneyland and take quick weekend trips (some even make it a single day trip!). Plus, the national parks of both California and Utah are easily accessible and you can make it to plenty of them in just a few hours.

Lots of diverse and delicious food

Not only do you have access to hundreds, if not thousands, of amazing restaurants that serve every type of food imaginable, you’ll also find plenty of diverse international markets. You’ll get your pick of Moroccan, Puerto Rican, Malaysian, Greek, Peruvian and whatever other foods you like. Or, if you’re out for a night of excessive eating, you can go for one of the many buffets the city is known for.

The cons of moving to Las Vegas

With the good comes the bad — after all, no city is perfect and you’re always going to come across things you don’t like. Here are a few of the not-so-great things you can expect in Las Vegas.

las vegas desert

The heat

In other places with hot summers, it’s typically a tolerable heat and you can still do outdoor activities without feeling too uncomfortably hot. But in Vegas, the scorching hot summers make it almost unbearable anywhere that doesn’t have air conditioning. Sometimes, it’s even too hot for pools to open. And even if they’re open, the water won’t be nearly as refreshing — it feels more like soaking in a hot bath.

But if you need something entertaining to do while you’re at home during the extreme temperatures, you can test how long it takes for a scoop of ice cream to turn to liquid on the cement (times of eight seconds have frequently been reported) or you can try cooking an egg on the sidewalk!

Public transportation isn’t great

If you’re used to having access to a variety of great public transportation options like metros, buses and trams and not relying on a personal vehicle, then living in Vegas will be a major change for you. If you don’t have access to a car that you can drive around the city, you’ll spend hours waiting for and sitting on a bus, because that’s really your only other option.

You can always use ride-sharing services, but that can get pretty expensive when you consider that getting from one end of town to the other could take you upwards of 30 minutes.

It’s really dry

With it being a desert, you would expect Las Vegas to be dry. Because of that, lush greenery really doesn’t grow here. Some homes still have grass in their yard, but most people opt for desert landscaping — dirt, rocks and a few desert plants.

If you’re someone with long hair, get ready to double down on your deep conditioning routine — your hair will need it!

How to get started on your move to Las Vegas

Is the Entertainment Capital of the World the right place for you? No matter the kind of life you desire, there’s something for everyone in Las Vegas.

To get you started on your big move, check out the Moving Center for more information about planning your move, including free quotes and moving tips!

We use a rolling weighted average from Apartment Guide and Rent.com’s multifamily rental property inventory of one-bedroom apartments to determine our rent prices. Data was pulled in January 2021 and goes back for one year. We use a weighted average formula that more accurately represents price availability for each individual unit type and reduces the influence of seasonality on rent prices in specific markets.
Population and income numbers come from the U.S. Census Bureau.
Cost of living data comes from the Council for Community and Economic Research.
The rent information included in this article is used for illustrative purposes only. The data contained herein do not constitute financial advice or a pricing guarantee for any apartment.

The post Moving to Las Vegas: Everything You Need to Know appeared first on Rent Blog.

Source: rent.com

10 Things to Know About Living in Salt Lake City

When you think of big cities, Los Angeles, Chicago or New York likely come to mind. Salt Lake City — the capital of Utah — isn’t the most frequently talked about “big city” in the country. That being said, it is up and coming and has a lot to offer those who are considering making the move.

While Utah is a predominantly conservative state with a strong religious culture, it offers a wide mix of neighborhoods. The charming neighborhoods scattered throughout the city are full of boutiques, small businesses and appealing restaurants that will make you want to eat out every meal.

Salt Lake City also has many schools — elementary through college and university — for people who are looking for a great education for their children or themselves. The city is also becoming more popular thanks to Silicon Slopes, the tech hub just south of the city center. The cost of living in Salt Lake City is relatively inexpensive when compared to larger cities, too.

There are always pros and cons when moving to a new city. Here are 10 things to know about living in Salt Lake City before you make your decision about moving to the Beehive State.

1. The weather can change quickly

Salt Lake City experiences all four seasons. People who live here often joke that the weather changes every 20 minutes. It can be freezing and snowing in the morning and then hot by noon. Some of the ski resorts have even been open on the Fourth of July! People can ski in the morning and spend the afternoon soaking by the pool.

Each season offers something truly fantastic for residents of Salt Lake. The winters are filled with crisp, white snow and brisk air. Fall is perfect for light jacket weather, and the changing leaves are spectacular in every canyon. Spring welcomes a much-needed break from the cold with perfect temperatures and beautiful blooming flowers. The summer comes all at once, hot and blistering making you long for the cold winter days. But no matter the season, S.L.C. is always beautiful.

salt lake city

2. It’s cheaper than other big cities

Compared to large, metro cities across the nation, the cost of living in Salt Lake is relatively inexpensive. The average rate for rent of a one-bedroom apartment dropped 11 percent between 2019 and 2020. Here’s a quick look at 2020 apartment costs in S.L.C.:

  • Studio apartment: $1,129
  • One-bedroom apartment: $1,245
  • Two-bedroom apartment: $1,565

Other utilities and expenses, such as food, gas and groceries, are all reasonably priced in Salt Lake City, too.

3. It’s not all Mormon (but there is a lot)

To understand the culture of Salt Lake City and Utah, you have to know a little about its history. In the year 1847, a group of Mormon pioneers trekked to Utah pulling wagons and handcarts and settled in the valley. For the next several decades, many more wagons full of Mormons followed as they escaped religious persecution back East. Because of this, the majority of residents in Utah are Mormon or have a family history rooted to the LDS church.

That being said, there are still plenty of other religions in the state. Salt Lake City is an ever-changing place with hip, up-and-coming liberal areas, such as Sugar House and nearby resorts like Park City. The city has also recently been named one of the best places for millennials in the country.

Conservative or not, there’s a spot for you in Salt Lake City.

4. There’s a real food scene

Green Jell-O may be the first thing that comes to mind when you think about the food in Salt Lake City. However, Salt Lake City boasts a diverse restaurant scene. You can find anything from Mexican food to French bakeries to authentic Japanese food within a block from each other.

Restaurants like Sapa in downtown Salt Lake put a modern twist on Japanese favorites. If you’re in the mood for a café where you can sit down, drink coffee and pretend you’re in Paris, try Eva’s Bakery located on Main Street in the heart of the city. Their pastries never disappoint. Or, try the nationally acclaimed Mexican restaurant Red Iguana.

Utah also has food that can’t be found anywhere else, such as fry sauce. The delicious blend of ketchup and mayo is the perfect fry accessory and will leave you wondering why you can’t find it elsewhere.

5. “The best snow on earth”

When driving through S.L.C., you’ll probably stumble upon a license plate that reads “The Best Snow on Earth.” That’s because, among other things, Utah is known for its incredible mountains and ski resorts. Every year, the mountains get an abundance of powdery snow. According to Ski Utah, the Utah Cottonwood Canyons are one of the snowiest places on earth. The weather and climate in Utah create the perfect powder that makes your skis glide down the mountain flawlessly.

One of the best things about skiing in Utah is that the resorts are all relatively close to Salt Lake City, and there are a lot to choose from. Places like Deer Valley Ski Resort bring in people from all over the world — this was one of the ski resorts that hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics.

Although this particular resort doesn’t allow snowboarders, there are plenty of other resorts that do, like Brighton. Ski season can last anywhere from November to late April and sometimes even longer. If you like outdoor activities in the winter, you’ll love living in Salt Lake City.

utah skiing

6. The mountains are also great in the summer

When people aren’t skiing the mountains, they’re hiking them as Salt Lake City is close to a lot of trails — give or take 30 minutes from the city center to the top of the canyon and trailheads. There are moderate trails, such as Neffs Canyon, that are dog friendly to more difficult trails like Mount Olympus. These trails make for a great way to spend your spring afternoon. Hike in the morning and watch the sunrise — or midday and take a second to enjoy the view.

7. The sports scene is underrated

Utah’s sports scene includes some professional teams, several minor league outfits and colleges to support. In the heart of downtown Salt Lake City is the Jazz — the state’s NBA team. Catch a game during the season and watch stars like Donovan Mitchell and Rudy Gobert in action.

If basketball isn’t your thing, check out a soccer match and cheer on Real Salt Lake. Other sports teams native to Utah are the baseball team, The Bees, and the hockey team, The Grizzlies. You can also check out a rivalry game between BYU and Utah during college football season. No matter your sport of choice, you can enjoy a hot dog and churro and cheer on your sports team.

8. Transportation and traffic isn’t that bad … usually

Traffic in Salt Lake is moderate. There are, of course, areas that see heavier traffic, especially if you’re heading southbound out of S.L.C., but on the whole, it’s not that bad. The streets in Salt Lake feel massive compared to other cities around the world. When Salt Lake was built, the roads had to be big enough that a wagon being pulled by ox could make a full U-turn. The city’s grid-like roads enable drivers to get around the city without confusion.

9. The air quality is surprisingly not great

One of the major cons of living in Salt Lake City is air quality. According to IQAir, S.L.C. has some of the worst air quality in the country. Part of the reason is its location in a valley that traps the pollution, making it difficult to cycle in new, clean air. Winter is the worst season for air pollution in the city, but the pollution fluctuates year-round.

salt lake city tourist attractions

10. The city is full of must-see places

Living in Salt Lake City gives you the advantage to see all that the state has to offer. In the winter, no matter your religious or spiritual beliefs, the Temple Square Christmas lights are a must-see. They bring to life the twinkle and magic that is the holiday season.

Park City is also a beautiful place to escape from the city during the winter. During the Sundance Film Festival, you might even spot a celebrity or 10. Southern Utah is also a must-visit. Utah has five national parks within a three- to four-hour drive from the city center — places like Zion, Bryce Canyon and Moab offer breathtaking views and scenery that just can’t be duplicated.

Living in Salt Lake City

There are so many pros to picking Salt Lake City as your place of residence. From all the outdoor activities to the diverse food scene, there’s something for everyone in Salt Lake City. You’ll enjoy the four seasons, the people and the opportunities that are present for everyone here.

Rent prices are based on a rolling weighted average from Apartment Guide and Rent.com’s multifamily rental property inventory of one-bedroom apartments. Data was pulled in November 2020 and goes back for one year. We use a weighted average formula that more accurately represents price availability for each individual unit type and reduces the influence of seasonality on rent prices in specific markets.
The rent information included in this article is used for illustrative purposes only. The data contained herein do not constitute financial advice or a pricing guarantee for any apartment.

The post 10 Things to Know About Living in Salt Lake City appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

Get Two Months Free on This Adams Morgan Studio

The Best Apartment Deals In DC Right Now | Cheap DC Apartments

We’re all about scoring a good deal here at Apartminty.  While we love perusing the top-of-the-line luxury apartments in DC, we also understand, sometimes an affordable rent is the better option. Either way, instead of you searching for Washington, DC apartments on Craigslist and property management company listing sites, we are delivering our choice of the best apartments to rent in DC right now.  Here’s our pick for the best Washington, DC apartment for rent today. Want more information on moving to DC? Check out Apartminty’s  Ultimate Guide to Moving to Washington, DC.

Adams Morgan/Columbia Heights

THE SHAWMUT

1768 Columbia Road NW

Washington, DC 20009

Studio Apartment
$1325/month
Unit #: 308
330 Sq Ft
Available Now

Why it’s a great deal:
The Shawmut is in the intersection of Adams Morgan and Kalorama and just a quick walk to Dupont Circle.  This apartment building is one of the most pet friendly buildings in D.C. They allow cats and dogs, but do not charge pet rent or a pet fee.  The customer service and maintenance team are incredible.   

The price on this studio apartment is not something you will see often! PLUS The Shawmut is offering two months free if you lease before the end of December!  You are only responsible for electric and cooking gas.   If you’re interested, reach out today! Looking for something a little different? Check out Apartminty’s guide How to Find an Apartment in DC.   *Pictures may not be of exact unit.*

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Read Get Two Months Free on This Adams Morgan Studio on Apartminty.

Source: blog.apartminty.com