How To Avoid Being House Poor

How Much Home Can I AffordEarlier this year, I published the post Is Being House Poor Limiting You? While no one ever thinks they will fall into being house poor, it does happen to some. Due to this, when asking yourself the question “how much home can I afford,” it’s best to think about ALL of the expenses that go into homeownership.

There are many “hidden” costs that go into homeownership that many do not think about when buying a home. While some homes may seem affordable, there are many factors and expenses to think about.

According to recent data from Zillow:

  • U.S. homeowners on average spend more than $9,000 per year in hidden homeownership costs and maintenance expenses
  • U.S. homeowners pay an average of $6,042 per year in unavoidable hidden costs: homeowners insurance, property taxes and utilities
  • U.S. homeowners pay an average of $3,435 per year in annual optional costs including house cleaning, yard care, gutter cleaning, carpet cleaning, and pressure washing.

That’s a lot of extra money each year that many homeowners do not realize that they may need to pay for.

By not knowing about these costs, a person may become stressed due to the amount of debt they may rack up from being house poor. It may also delay retirement, lead to a house being empty (there might be no money left to decorate), and more.

There are things you can do though so that you can make sure you don’t fall into a house poor situation, though. When pondering the question “How much home can I afford,” think about the many tips below.

 

Add up all of the costs.

Buying a home can easily lead to being house poor if you don’t do enough research. This can limit you because you may be even more house poor than you originally thought.

When some families buy a home, they don’t think about the total cost of homeownership. While you may be able to afford the monthly mortgage payment, you may not be able to afford everything else if you don’t do your research.

Before you say “yes” to a home, I recommend you add up all of the extra costs that you may have to pay for if you decide to buy a specific home.

Other homeownership costs include:

  • Gas. Many homes run on gas in order to have hot water, to use the stove, and so on.
  • Electricity. Generally, the bigger your home then the higher your electricity bill will be.
  • Sewer.  This isn’t super expensive, but it is generally around $30 a month from what I’ve seen.
  • Trash.  This isn’t super expensive either but it does cost money.
  • Water (and possibly irrigation).  Water bills can vary widely. I know many who live in areas where the average water bill is a few hundred each month.
  • Property taxes. Property taxes can vary widely from town to town. You may find yourself looking at two similar houses with similar price tags, but the property taxes may vary by thousands of dollars annually. That is a LOT of money. While it may seem small when compared to the actual home purchase price, remember that you have to pay property taxes annually and a difference of just $3,600 a year is $300 a month for life.
  • Home insurance. Home insurance can be cheap in some areas but crazy expensive in others. Don’t forget to look into the cost of earthquake, flood, and hurricane insurance as well as that can add up quickly depending on where you live.
  • Maintenance and repairs. Even if your home is brand new, you may have to pay for repairs, which is something that many don’t realize. No matter how old your home is, repair and maintenance costs will eventually come into play.
  • Homeowners association fees. This can also vary widely. You should always see if the house you are interested in is in an HOA because the fees can be high and there may be rules you don’t like as well.
  • Home furnishings. Furnishing your home can be done cheaply, but I know some who buy huge homes but can’t afford to put anything in them, such as a table, a bed, and so on. Why own a $500,000 house if you don’t have any furniture?

Related: Home Buying Tips You Need To Know Before You Buy

 

Buy for less than what you are approved for.

Many potential homeowners are approved for home loans that are somewhere around 30% to 35% of their salary before taxes.

That’s a lot of money. This amount is before taxes as well, which means that your actual monthly home payment would be a significant portion of your take-home income each month. Many who buy at the full approval amount cannot afford their homes due to the fact that it is such a significant percentage of what they earn.

If you don’t want to be house poor, then you should make sure to buy a home that is less than what you are approved for. You should also add up all of the costs of owning a home and make sure it is an amount that you are comfortable with.

Related posts:

  • Renting Out A Room In Your Home For Extra Money
  • How To Live On One Income
  • Ways To Make An Extra $1,000 A Month

 

Have an emergency fund.

An emergency fund isn’t just to protect you from your job. They also exist to help you in case something goes wrong with your home.

Your roof could spring a leak, a tree may fall on your home, a pipe may burst, there may be an electrical problem and more. Homes have many things that go into them and you never know if something may need to be fixed.

By having an emergency fund, you will have a fund that will help you if something were to go wrong. It will be you be more prepared so that you don’t have to take on any debt in order to help pay for an expense.

What would you say to someone who asks “How much home can I afford?” Do you know anyone who is house poor?

 

The post How To Avoid Being House Poor appeared first on Making Sense Of Cents.

Source: makingsenseofcents.com

Nevada County, California VA Loan Information

Table of Contents

  • What is the VA Loan Limit?
  • How to Apply for a VA Home Loan?
  • What is the Median Home Price?
  • What are the VA Appraisal Fees?
  • Do I need Flood Insurance?
  • How do I learn about Property Taxes?
  • What is the Population?
  • What are the major cities?
  • About Nevada County
  • Veteran Information
  • Apply for a VA Home Loan
  • VA Approved Condos

FAQ

What is the VA Loan Limit?

2021 VA Home Loan Limit: $0 down up to $5,000,000* (Subject to lender limits) /2 open VA loans at one time $548,250* (Call 888-573-4496 for details).

How to Apply for a VA Home Loan?

This is a quick look at how to apply for a VA home loan in Nevada County. For a more detailed overview of the VA home loan process, check out our complete guide on how to apply for a VA home loan. Here, we’ll go over the general steps to getting a VA home loan and point out some things to pay attention to in Nevada County. If you have any questions, you can call us at VA HLC and we’ll help you get started.

  1. Get your Certificate of Eligibility (COE)
    • Give us a call at (877) 432-5626 and we’ll get your COE for you.
  2. Are you applying for a refinance loan? Check out our complete guide to VA Refinancing.
  3. Get pre-approved, to get pre-approved for a loan, you’ll need:
    • Previous two years of W2s
    • Most recent 30 days paystubs or LES (active duty)
    • Most recent 60 days bank statements
    • Landlord and HR/Payroll Department contact info
  4. Find a home
    • We can help you check whether the home is in one of the Nevada County flood zones
  5. Get the necessary inspections
    • Termite inspection: required
    • Well or septic inspections needed, if applicable
  6. Get the home appraised
    • We can help you find a VA-Certified appraiser in Nevada County and schedule the process
    • Construction loan note: Construction permit/appraisal info
      1. Building permit
      2. Elevation certificate
  7. Lock-in your interest rates
    • Wait until the appraisal to lock-in your loan rates. If it turns out you need to make repairs, it can push your closing back. Then you can get stuck paying rate extension fees.
  8. Close the deal and get packing!
    • You’re ready to go.

What is the Median Home Price?

As of March 31st, 2020, the median home value for Nevada County is $477,219. In addition, the median household income for residents of the county is $63,240.

How much are the VA Appraisal Fees?

  • Single-Family: $600.
  • Individual Condo: $600.
  • Manufactured Homes: $600.
  • 2-4 Unit Multi-Family: $850.
  • Appraisal Turnaround Times: 7 days.

Do I need Flood Insurance?

  • The VA requires properties are required to have flood insurance if they are in a Special Flood Hazard Area.
  • In Nevada county, the mountainous terrain reduces flood hazard areas to small areas surrounding bodies of water.

How do I learn about Property Taxes?

  • Sue Home is the Nevada county tax assessor. Her office can be reached at 905 Maidu Avenue Suite 290 Nevada City, California 95959. In addition, her office can also be reached by calling 530-265-1232.
  • The state of California offers various incentive programs that expand statewide for new, growing, and relocating businesses. Two of these programs are California Competes Tax Credit which offers qualifying businesses tax credit and the New employment Credit program which offers a tax credit for taxpayers who hire full-time employees. These and many other programs help in further diversifying the state’s economy.

What is the Population?

  • The county’s population of 99,755 is 84% White, 9% Hispanic, and 3% two or more races.
  • Most county residents are between 18 and 65 years old, with 17% under 18 years old and 28% older than 65.
  • In total, the county has about 40,904 households, at an average of two people per household.

What are the major cities?

The county has two cities and one town, including Nevada City which serves as the county seat. The two other cities in the county are Grass Valley and Truckee.

About Nevada County

Formed in 1851, 13 years prior to the neighboring state of Nevada attaining statehood, Nevada County was actually the first area of the United States to include the stand-alone word Nevada in its name. The term’s etymology is from the name the Sierra Nevada, Spanish for snow-covered. Nevada County is known for its involvement in the California Gold Rush. The early years of California are featured prominently throughout the county. The Nevada Theatre, built in 1865 making it the oldest theater in the state continues to operate to this day. Many notable figures have performed on the stage at the Nevada Theatre, ranging from Mark Twain to Motley Crue.

Further providing Nevada County notoriety is its place as the birthplace of Arcade Video games, with the inception of Pong. The creation of Pong led to the county being nicknamed the “Silicon Valley of the Sierras.” The first cell phone for commercial usage, with the capability of taking photos, was developed in the county seat of Nevada City. Currently, over 1,000 software designers and developers reside in the county.

Our nation’s 31st President, Herbert Hoover once lived in Nevada City, earning a living as a miner, fresh out of Stanford University.

The timber industry, government services, and tourism are the driving forces of the local economy.

Tourism based on the history of this country is reflected in many of the museums found in Nevada County. These museums put the history of the Gold Rush, mining, and the railroad at the forefront. The county is also home to numerous state parks including Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park, Grass Valley’s Empire Mine State Historic Park, and Donner Memorial State Park.

A veteran property tax exemption exists for veteran homeowners in Nevada County, amounting to $4,000. A disabled veterans exemption which is for a far greater monetary sum is accessible for disabled veterans with a total disability, blindness or the loss of use of more than one limb. This exemption is also available for the surviving spouses of disabled veterans.

Veteran Information

The county is currently home to 8,319 veterans, and they all have access to:

  • Nevada County is home to one VFW post:
    • Post-2655 Banner Mountian: 415 North Pine Street, Nevada City, CA 95959.
  • County Veteran Assistance Information
    • Nevada County Veteran Services Office: 988 McCourtney Road Grass Valley, CA 95949.

Apply for a VA Home Loan

  • For more information about VA Home Loans and how to apply, click here.
  • If you meet the VA’s eligibility requirements, you will be able to enjoy some of the best government guaranteed home loans available.  
  • VA loans can finance the construction of a property. However, the property must be owned and prepared for construction as the VA cannot ensure vacant land loans.

VA Approved Condos

Name (ID): THE BOULDERS (000151)
Address: 
10844 CINNABAR WAY
TRUCKEE CA 96161
NEVADA
Status: Accepted Without Conditions
Request Received Date: 05/13/2015
Review Completion Date: 06/02/2015

Oregon VA Loan Information: https://www.vahomeloancenters.org/oregon-va-home-loan-limits/

VA Loan Information by State: https://www.vahomeloancenters.org/va-loan-limit-maximum-va-loan-amount/

The post Nevada County, California VA Loan Information appeared first on VA Home Loan Centers.

Source: vahomeloancenters.org

Benton County, Oregon VA Loan Information

Table of Contents

  • What is the VA Loan Limit?
  • How to Apply for a VA Home Loan?
  • What is the Median Home Price?
  • What are the VA Appraisal Fees?
  • Do I need Flood Insurance?
  • How do I learn about Property Taxes?
  • What is the Population?
  • What are the major cities?
  • About Benton County
  • Veteran Information
  • Apply for a VA Home Loan
  • VA Approved Condos

FAQ

What is the VA Loan Limit?

2021 VA Home Loan Limit: $0 down payment up to $5,000,000* (subject to lender limits) /2 open VA loans at one time $548,250 (Call 877-432-5626 for details).

How to Apply for a VA Home Loan?

This is a quick look at how to apply for a VA home loan in Benton county. For a more detailed overview of the VA home loan process, check out our complete guide on how to apply for a VA home loan. Here, we’ll go over the general steps to getting a VA home loan and point out some things to pay attention to in Benton County. If you have any questions, you can call us at VA HLC and we’ll help you get started.

  1. Get your Certificate of Eligibility (COE)
    • Give us a call at (877) 432-5626 and we’ll get your COE for you.
  2. Are you applying for a refinance loan? Check out our complete guide to VA Refinancing.
  3. Get pre-approved, to get pre-approved for a loan, you’ll need:
    • Previous two years of W2s
    • Most recent 30 days paystubs or LES (active duty)
    • Most recent 60 days bank statements
    • Landlord and HR/Payroll Department contact info
  4. Find a home
    • We can help you check whether the home is in one of the Benton County flood zones
  5. Get the necessary inspections
    • Termite inspection: required
    • Well or septic inspections needed, if applicable
  6. Get the home appraised
    • We can help you find a VA-Certified appraiser in Benton County and schedule the process
    • Construction loan note: Construction permit/appraisal info
      1. Building permit
      2. Elevation certificate
  7. Lock-in your interest rates
    • Pro tip: Wait until the appraisal to lock-in your loan rates. If it turns out you need to make repairs, it can push your closing back. Then you can get stuck paying rate extension fees.
  8. Close the deal and get packing!
    • You’re ready to go.

What is the Median Home Price?

As of August 31st, 2020, the median home value for Benton County is $385,002. In addition, the median household income for residents of the county is $58,655.

How much are the VA Appraisal Fees?

  • Single-Family: $775.
  • Individual Condo: $825.
  • Manufactured Homes: $825.
  • 2-4 Unit Multi-Family: $950.
  • Appraisal Turnaround Times: 10 days.

Do I need Flood Insurance?

  • The VA requires properties are required to have flood insurance if they are in a Special Flood Hazard Area.
  • In Benton County, most flood hazard areas are located along the Willamette River which borders the county to the east. Several other creeks within the county are also prone to flooding. However, one of the most significant flood hazard areas is Marys River which floods areas within the city of Corvallis.

How do I learn about Property Taxes?

  • The Benton county tax assessor’s office is located at 4077 S.W. Research Way Corvallis, Oregon, 97333. In addition, the office can also be reached by calling (541) 766-6855
  • Oregon offers businesses that invest and hire within enterprise zones the option to be exempt from property taxes for at least three years. In addition, the Oregon Investment Advantage encourages new businesses to start and relocating to the state. For example, the program offers income tax subtraction, and it can also eliminate state income liability for new businesses for many years.

What is the Population?

  • The county’s population of 93,053 is 79% White, 7% Hispanic, and 7% Asian.
  • Most county residents are between 18 and 65 years old, with 16% under 18 years old and 17% older than 65.
  • In total, the county has about 35,056 households, at an average of two people per household.

What are the major cities?

The county has five cities, including the city of Corvallis, which serves as the county seat. In addition, there are four other cities Adair Village, Albany, Monroe, and Philomath.

About Benton County

Benton County is located in western Oregon and is home to a friendly local community and excellent dining options. Fun in the Oregon wilderness is waiting at any of the beautiful outdoor spots in the county. Many fun and interesting attractions can be found all over the area, including museums, art galleries, golf courses, and much more. Don’t miss out on any of the exciting festivals held in the county, where you can truly celebrate like a local! Benton County was officially founded on December 23, 1847, and was named after Thomas Hart Benton, who served as a U.S. Senator. The current population of the county is 90,951.

Enjoy all the beauty of the Oregon landscape at any of the scenic outdoor spots in Benton County. The E.E. Wilson Wildlife Area is the perfect place to get away from it all, featuring beautiful hiking trails and scenic campsites. For some of the best hiking and rock-climbing opportunities, be sure to check out Mary’s Peak, which offers majestic lookout points. Bring your friends and family to Riverfront Commemorative Park, which features walking paths, picnic areas, and much more. Other scenic outdoor spots in the county include the Alsea Falls Recreation Site and the Beazell Memorial Forest.

A great time is waiting at any of the amazing attractions in Benton County. The Arts Center is a can’t-miss for art-lovers, featuring a huge variety of paintings and sculptures made by talented artists. The Arts Center also hosts workshops, rotating exhibits, and special events. If you are interested in local history, then be sure to visit all the amazing exhibits and artifacts housed within the County Historical Museum. Check out the beautiful Darkside Cinema, which is independently owned and showcases both independent and art films. Other great attractions in the county include the Majestic Theater, Art in the Valley, and the LaSells Stewart Center.

A fun time for the whole family is waiting at all the exciting events held in Benton County. The County Fair and Rodeo bring out most of the local community to enjoy carnival rides, fun games, and delicious local food. Try a multitude of delicious drinks at Corvallis Beer Week. Other great events held in the county include the Corvallis Fall Festival and the Red Blue and Riverfront Festival.

Veteran Information

There are about 5,249 veterans currently living within Benton County, which offers assistance to veterans through:

Benton County is home to one VFW post:

  • Post 3957 Monroe Post – 605 Main Street, Monroe, Oregon 97456.

VA Medical Centers in the county:

  • Benton County VSO – 777 NW 9th Street, Suite 202, Corvallis, Oregon 97330.
  •  

VA Home Loan Information

  • For more information about VA Home Loans and how to apply, click here.
  • If you meet the VA’s eligibility requirements, you will be able to enjoy some of the best government guaranteed home loans available.  
  • VA loans can finance the construction of a property. However, the property must be owned and prepared for construction as the VA cannot ensure vacant land loans.

VA Approved Condos

There are currently no VA approved condos in Benton County, Oregon. However, if you’re interested in getting a condo through the approval process give us a call at (877) 432-5626. We can help you through the condo approval process.   

Oregon VA Loan Information: https://www.vahomeloancenters.org/oregon-va-home-loan-limits/

VA Loan Information by State: https://www.vahomeloancenters.org/va-loan-limit-maximum-va-loan-amount/

The post Benton County, Oregon VA Loan Information appeared first on VA Home Loan Centers.

Source: vahomeloancenters.org

Ladera Lending Review: A Top-Rated SoCal Mortgage Lender

Today we’ll profile another Southern California-based mortgage lender, Ladera Lending, which recently landed in LendingTree’s top-10 list for customer satisfaction. Despite being around for slightly longer than a decade, they managed to fund nearly a billion in home loans last year. And they accomplished this feat while only working in about a dozen states, which [&hellip

The post Ladera Lending Review: A Top-Rated SoCal Mortgage Lender first appeared on The Truth About Mortgage.

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

Understanding How Mortgage Interest Rates Work

Question: What do home mortgage loans (including second mortgage loans), retail installment loans, automobile loans, home improvement loans, and mobile home loans, have in common — aside from being loans to consumers?

Answer: The interest charge sometimes is calculated monthly and sometimes daily. With a monthly interest rate the borrower is charged for each month, whereas with a daily interest rate the borrower is charged for each day.

Why is this distinction important? Because daily rates are a potential trap for unwary borrowers, countless numbers of whom have found themselves permanently, usually with no understanding of how it happened. The problem has been entirely overlooked by regulators, including the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.


Source: mortgagedaily.com

Choosing the Best Mortgage Lender

The process of finding the best mortgage loan begins with finding the best mortgage lender. They can ensure this process runs smoothly, you get the best rates, and any issues are dealt with in a timely and satisfactory manner.

But with so many different lenders, how do you know which one is right for you?

How to Find the Best Lender and Get the Best Mortgage Rates

The following tips should help you to find the best mortgage rates and lenders, potentially saving you a great deal of time, stress, and money.

1. Improve Your Credit Score

Your credit score is an important part of the mortgage process and is considered for all loans and new lines of credit. It tells lenders what kind of borrower you are and is used to determine the likelihood that you will default on your debt. If the likelihood is high and your credit score is low, you may be refused a new mortgage altogether.

There are types of mortgages that don’t require high credit scores, including those backed by the FHA. However, your credit score will still be considered and will influence the interest rate you’re offered.

2. Improve Your Debt-to-Income Ratio

Can your finances bear the weight of a new loan, one that comes with a large upfront payment and a large monthly payment? By calculating your debt-to-income ratio you can find out.

Your debt-to-income ratio estimates your affordability by comparing your monthly debt payments to your gross monthly income. For example, if you have an income of $3,000 and monthly debt payments of $600, your debt-to-income ratio is 20%, as $600 is 20% of $3,000.

Anything under 43% should be accepted once your mortgage payments have been added to the total. Some mortgage lenders will go as high as 50%. However, the higher it is, the more at-risk you are by adding new debt to your total, because once you add living costs and bills to the mix, you’ll be left with very little cash and will be one unexpected bill from complete disaster.

Reduce your debt-to-income ratio as much as possible before you apply for any new credit.

3. Reduce Your Budget

The right loan amount is more important than the right mortgage lender. The majority of borrowers overestimate how much they can afford, stretch their budgets to the maximum, and suffer the consequences years down the line. 

Most homeowners have regrets and for many, the biggest regret is not buying a cheaper house and believing they can afford more than they actually can. Your monthly mortgage payment shouldn’t stretch you too thin, nor should it leave you crippled financially. There should be some room to maneuver, some room to make extra payments when you can and to use that money for other bills and expenses when you can’t.

Think twice about spending big on your dream home and look at the benefits of getting a cheaper house. For instance, you’ll require a smaller mortgage total, could secure a better interest rate, can get a shorter term, and, therefore, will pay much less over the life of the loan.

A fixed-rate mortgage over 15-years will cost less than the same rate over 40-years. With the former, as much as 60% of your initial monthly payment could go towards the principal, and that will increase every month from there. With the latter, you could be paying just 20% to 30% towards your principal, which means you’ll clear equity at a snail’s pace.

4. Think About Your Options

You have more options than you realize when it comes to mortgage lenders and loan programs. These options include:

Conventional Loans

A conventional home loan is one that’s not backed by any government agency and typically requires a 20% down payment. These loans often used a fixed rate of interest but there are also adjustable-rate versions known as Hybrid ARMs.

Conventional loans can be conforming, which means they are less than the maximum limits set by the Federal Housing Finance Agency and meet the standards required by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, or non-conforming. There are also low down payment versions where as little as 3% is required. However, in such cases, borrowers will be asked to pay Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) until 20% equity is attained.

FHA Loans

​FHA loans are backed by the Federal Housing Administration and offered by traditional lenders. The down payments are smaller and there is built-in insurance protection to cover the lender in the event that the borrower fails to keep up with monthly mortgage payments.

Borrowers need a credit score of 500 and a down payment of 10% or a credit score of 580 and a down payment of 3.5% to get an FHA loan. As a result of these reduced requirements, FHA loans may be better suited for most first-time home buyers, but that doesn’t necessarily make an FHA loan the best choice. What’s more, as they are offered by multiple mortgage companies, you still need to find the right lender and lock-in the best rate.

VA Loans

Offered by the Department of Veteran Affairs, these loans make it easier for military veterans and active personnel to get home loans. You can get a VA loan with no down payment and 90% of borrowers do just that. However, as with all other types of loans, by increasing your down payment you can reduce your rate.

USDA Loans

Offered by the United States Department of Agriculture, these loans don’t require a down payment and can be used for homes in rural areas.

Down Payments

One of the most important aspects of the home buying process is the down payment, which is the amount that you pay upfront. The higher this amount is, the lower your mortgage loan needs to be and the less interest you will pay as a result. What’s more, a down payment can also take you above the magical 20% mark with a conventional loan. 

Not only will this massively reduce your total interest, but it will negate the need for Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) which could cost you as much as $100 a month on the average house purchase.

Many borrowers overlook these benefits because they focus on the short term. They don’t care if they are paying 50% more over the life of the loan, as the house is still technically theirs and the end result will be exactly the same. If they’re not paying much more per month and don’t notice the impact on a month to month basis, what’s the point?

The point it, you could save huge sums of money over the life of the loan and own 100% of your house much sooner. This gives you more options in the future with regards to equity loans, cash-out refinancing, and more. 

It also prevents any issues for your heirs when if you die before the mortgage clears in full. This way, you’re leaving them a house that is fully paid off and can be passed on directly, as opposed to one that has debt attached and needs to be handed down with that debt and that responsibility.

5. Compare and Get Pre-Approval

The next step is to work with mortgage lenders and mortgage brokers, see which ones work best for you and can provide you with what you need. You can look into online lenders, banks, and credit unions, check online reviews, speak with friends and family, ask experts, and generally do everything you can to find the best one. Ultimately, however, it all comes down to what they can offer you.

Once you find the one that is right for you, the one that offers the lowest rate and gives you what you need, you can get a pre-approval. The lender will check your credit report and give you a loan estimate, which will give you an idea of how much you can borrow and what you can expect to pay.

It’s worth noting, however, that this pre-approval isn’t set in stone. It is subject to additional checks performed prior to the loan. If you apply for a lot of credit cards and lose your job between pre-approval and mortgage, you’ll likely be rejected and that contract will be ripped up.

6. Check the Small Print

Don’t let your excitement get the better of you, don’t be too eager. Read the small print, make sure you understand the loan terms and know what sort of origination fees and other closing costs you’ll be expected to pay. These differ from lender to lender and some of them can be negotiated, so don’t assume that they are standard across the board and can’t be changed.

If you’re not sure about any step of the process, ask questions. If you feel a little out of your depth, do some more research. We have countless articles on mortgages here and can help with everything from mortgage terms to the actual mortgage application, after which we can guide you towards the best strategies for paying off your balance.

Choosing the Best Mortgage Lender is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

First Time Home Buyer Programs for Veterans

Numerous programs exist to help veterans and service members who are first-time buyers with their closing costs and other expenses.

Indeed, it’s perfectly possible for those who are eligible for VA home loans to become homeowners with very little — or even nothing — in the way of savings.

Check today's VA rates by completing this quick online form.

Advantages of VA home loans for first-time buyers

The most famous housing benefit associated with the VA loan program is the zero down payment requirement. That can be hugely valuable for first time home buyers.

But it’s just one of a whole range of advantages that come with a VA home loan. Here are some more.

Low mortgage rates for VA loans

According to the Ellie Mae Origination Report, in October 2020, the average rate for a 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage backed by the VA was just 2.75%. That compares with 3.01% for conventional loans (ones not backed by the government) and 3.01% for FHA loans.

So VA home loans have lower rates. And that wasn’t just a one-time fluke. VA mortgage rates are lower on average than those for other loans — month after month, year after year.

Lower funding fees for first-time buyers

When you buy a home with a VA loan, you need to pay a funding fee. However, you can choose to pay it on closing or add it to your loan so you pay it down with the rest of your mortgage.

But, as a first-time buyer, you get a lower rate. For you, it’s 2.3% of the loan amount (instead of 3.6% for repeat purchasers) if you make a down payment between zero and 5%.

That’s $2,300 for every $100,000 borrowed, which can be wrapped into the loan amount. It’s a savings of $1,300 per $100,000 versus repeat buyers.

Put down more and your funding fee drops whether or not you’re a first-time buyer. So it’s 1.65% if you put down 5% or more, and 1.4% if you put down 10% or more.

Although it might seem like just another fee, the VA funding fee is well worth the cost since it buys you the significant financial benefits of a VA home loan.

No mortgage insurance for VA loans

Mortgage insurance is what non-VA borrowers usually have to pay if they don’t have a 20 percent down payment. Private mortgage insurance typically takes the form of a payment on closing, along with monthly payments going forward.

That’s no small benefit since mortgage insurance can represent a significant amount of money. For example, FHA home buyers pay over $130 per month on a $200,000 loan — for years.

Mortgage insurance vs funding fee

Let’s do a side-by-side comparison of the mortgage insurance vs. funding fee costs of a $200,000 loan:

  VA Loan FHA Loan
Payable on closing $4,600* $3,500
Payable monthly $0 $133 per month**
Paid after five years (60 months) $4,600 $11,500

*First-time buyer rate with zero down payment: 2.3%. $200,000 x 2.3% = $4,600
** $200,000 loan x 0.8% annual mortgage insurance = $1,600 per year. That’s $8,000 over five years. $1,600 divided by 12 months = $133.33 every month

It’s clear that mortgage insurance can be a real financial burden — and that the funding fee is a great deal for eligible borrowers.

Better yet, that makes a difference to your buying power. Because, absent mortgage insurance, you’re $133 a month better off. And that means you can afford a higher home purchase price with the same housing expenses.

Ready to buy a home? Start here.

Types of first-time homebuyer programs for VA loans

You may find two main types of assistance as a first-time buyer:

  1. Down payment or closing cost assistance
  2. Mortgage credit certificates

Down payment and closing cost assistance

There are thousands of down payment assistance programs (DAPs) across the United States and that includes at least one in each state. Many states have several.

Each DAP is independent and sets its own rules and offerings. So, unfortunately, we can’t say, “You’re in line to get this …” because “this” varies so much from program to program.

Some help with closing costs as well and down payments. Some give you a low-interest loan that you pay down in parallel with your main mortgage. Others give “forgivable” loans that you don’t pay back — providing you stay in the home for a set period. And some give outright grants: effectively gifts.

Mortgage credit certificates (MCCs)

The name pretty much says it all. In some states, the housing finance agency or its equivalent issues mortgage credit certificates (MCCs) to homebuyers — especially first-time ones — that let them pay less in federal taxes.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation explains on its website (PDF):

“MCCs are issued directly to qualifying homebuyers who are then entitled to take a nonrefundable federal tax credit equal to a specified percentage of the interest paid on their mortgage loan each year. These tax credits can be taken at the time the borrowers file their tax returns. Alternatively, borrowers can amend their W-4 tax withholding forms from their employer to reduce the amount of federal income tax withheld from their paychecks in order to receive the benefit on a monthly basis.”

In other words, MCCs allow you to pay less federal tax. And that means you can afford a better, more expensive home than the one you could get without them.

Speak with a mortgage specialist today.

Dream Makers program

Unlike most DAPs, the Dream Makers Home Buying Assistance program from the PenFed Foundation is open only to those who’ve provided active duty, reserve, national guard, or veteran service.

You must also be a first-time buyer, although that’s defined as those who haven’t owned their own home within the previous three years. And you may qualify if you’ve lost your home to a disaster or a divorce.

But this help isn’t intended for the rich. Your income must be equal to or less than 80% of the median for the area in which you’re buying. However, that’s adjustable according to the size of your household. So if you have a spouse or dependents, you can earn more.

It’s all a bit complicated. So it’s just as well that PenFed has a lookup tool (on the US Dept. of Housing and Urban Development (HUD’s) website) that lets you discover the income limits and median family income where you want to buy.

What help does the Dream Makers program offer?

You’ll need a mortgage pre-approval or pre-qualification letter from an established lender to proceed. But then you stand to receive funds from the foundation as follows:

“The amount of the grant is determined by a 2-to-1 match of the borrower’s contribution to their mortgage in earnest deposit and cash brought at closing with a maximum grant of $5,000. The borrower must contribute a minimum of $500. No cash back can be received by the borrower at closing.”

So supposing you have $2,000 saved. The foundation could add $4,000 (2-to-1 match), giving you $6,000. In many places, that might easily be enough to see you become a homeowner.

You don’t have to use that money for a VA loan. You could opt for an FHA or conventional mortgage. But, given the advantages that come with VA loans, why would you?

The Dream Makers program is probably the most famous of those offering assistance to vets and service members. But there are plenty of others, many of which are locally based.

For example, residents of New York should check out that state’s Homes for Veterans program. That can provide up to $15,000 for those who qualify, whether or not they’re first-time buyers.

Start your home buying journey here.

State-By-State Home Buyer Assistance Programs

We promised to tell you how to find those thousands of DAPs — and the MCC programs that are available in many states.

It takes a little work to find all the ones that might be able to help you. But you should be able to track them down from the comfort of your own home, online and over the phone.

A good place to start is the HUD local homebuying programs lookup tool. Select the state where you want to buy then select a link and look for “assistance programs.”

Your best starting point is probably the state’s housing finance office though it might be called something slightly different. You should find details of programs or just a list of counties with phone numbers. Call the number where you want to buy, explain your situation and ask for advice. It’s their agents’ jobs to point you to local, state, or national programs that can help you.

If you look in the right place, you could secure some very worthwhile financial help to assist you in buying your first home.

Check today's VA rates by completing this quick online form.

Source: militaryvaloan.com

10-Year Mortgages vs. the 30-Year Fixed: Which Is Better?

It’s time for another mortgage match-up folks. Today, we’ll look at 10-year mortgages versus the 30-year fixed mortgage to see how these home loans stack up against one another. Before we get started, it’s important to note that there are two very different types of 10-year mortgages out there. One a fixed-rate mortgage that is [&hellip

The post 10-Year Mortgages vs. the 30-Year Fixed: Which Is Better? first appeared on The Truth About Mortgage.

Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

6 Things Your Mortgage Lender Wants You To Know About Getting a Home Loan During COVID-19

mortgage during coronavirusGetty Images

Getting a mortgage, paying your mortgage, refinancing your mortgage: These are all major undertakings, but during a pandemic, all of it becomes more complicated. Sometimes a lot more complicated.

But make no mistake, home buyers are still taking out and paying down mortgages during the current global health crisis. There have, in fact, been some silver linings amid the economic uncertainty—hello, record-low interest rates—but also plenty of changes to keep up with. Mortgage lending looks much different now than at the start of the year.

Whether you’re applying for a new mortgage, struggling to pay your current mortgage, or curious about refinancing, here’s what mortgage lenders from around the country want you to know.

1. Rates have dropped, but getting a mortgage has gotten more complicated

First, the good news about mortgage interest rates: “Rates have been very low in recent weeks, and have come back down to their absolute lowest levels in a long time,” says Yuri Umanski, senior mortgage consultant at Premia Relocation Mortgage in Troy, MI.

That means this could be a great time to take out a mortgage and lock in a low rate. But getting a mortgage is more difficult during a pandemic.

“Across the industry, underwriting a mortgage has become an even more complex process,” says Steve Kaminski, head of U.S. residential lending at TD Bank. “Many of the third-party partners that lenders rely on—county offices, appraisal firms, and title companies—have closed or taken steps to mitigate their exposure to COVID-19.”

Even if you can file your mortgage application online, Kaminski says many steps in the process traditionally happen in person, like getting notarization, conducting a home appraisal, and signing closing documents.

As social distancing makes these steps more difficult, you might have to settle for a “drive-by appraisal” instead of a thorough, more traditional appraisal inside the home.

“And curbside closings with masks and gloves started to pop up all over the country,” Umanski adds.

2. Be ready to prove (many times) that you can pay a mortgage

If you’ve lost your job or been furloughed, you might not be able to buy your dream house (or any house) right now.

“Whether you are buying a home or refinancing your current mortgage, you must be employed and on the job,” says Tim Ross, CEO of Ross Mortgage Corp. in Troy, MI. “If someone has a loan in process and becomes unemployed, their mortgage closing would have to wait until they have returned to work and received their first paycheck.”

Lenders are also taking extra steps to verify each borrower’s employment status, which means more red tape before you can get a loan.

Normally, lenders run two or three employment verifications before approving a new loan or refinancing, but “I am now seeing employment verification needed seven to 10 times—sometimes even every three days,” says Tiffany Wolf, regional director and senior loan officer at Cabrillo Mortgage in Palm Springs, CA. “Today’s borrowers need to be patient and readily available with additional documents during this difficult and uncharted time in history.”

3. Your credit score might not make the cut anymore

Economic uncertainty means lenders are just as nervous as borrowers, and some lenders are raising their requirements for borrowers’ credit scores.

“Many lenders who were previously able to approve FHA loans with credit scores as low as 580 are now requiring at least a 620 score to qualify,” says Randall Yates, founder and CEO of The Lenders Network.

Even if you aren’t in the market for a new home today, now is a good time to work on improving your credit score if you plan to buy in the future.

“These changes are temporary, but I would expect them to stay in place until the entire country is opened back up and the unemployment numbers drop considerably,” Yates says.

4. Forbearance isn’t forgiveness—you’ll eventually need to pay up

The CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act requires loan servicers to provide forbearance (aka deferment) to homeowners with federally backed mortgages. That means if you’ve lost your job and are struggling to make your mortgage payments, you could go months without owing a payment. But forbearance isn’t a given, and it isn’t always all it’s cracked up to be.

“The CARES Act is not designed to create a freedom from the obligation, and the forbearance is not forgiveness,” Ross says. “Missed payments will have to be made up.”

You’ll still be on the hook for the payments you missed after your forbearance period ends, so if you can afford to keep paying your mortgage now, you should.

To determine if you’re eligible for forbearance, call your loan servicer—don’t just stop making payments.

If your deferment period is ending and you’re still unable to make payments, you can request delaying payments for additional months, says Mark O’ Donovan, CEO of Chase Home Lending at JPMorgan Chase.

After you resume making your payments, you may be able to defer your missed payments to the end of your mortgage, O’Donovan says. Check with your loan servicer to be sure.

5. Don’t be too fast to refinance

Current homeowners might be eager to refinance and score a lower interest rate. It’s not a bad idea, but it’s not the best move for everyone.

“Homeowners should consider how long they expect to reside in their home,” Kaminski says. “They should also account for closing costs such as appraisal and title insurance policy fees, which vary by lender and market.”

If you plan to stay in your house for only the next two years, for example, refinancing might not be worth it—hefty closing costs could offset the savings you would gain from a lower interest rate.

“It’s also important to remember that refinancing is essentially underwriting a brand-new mortgage, so lenders will conduct income verification and may require the similar documentation as the first time around,” Kaminski adds.

6. Now could be a good time to take out a home equity loan

Right now, homeowners can also score low rates on a home equity line of credit, or HELOC, to finance major home improvements like a new roof or addition.

“This may be a great time to take out a home equity line to consolidate debt,” Umanski says. “This process will help reduce the total obligations on a monthly basis and allow for the balance to be refinanced into a much lower rate.”

Just be careful not to overimprove your home at a time when the economy and the housing market are both in flux.

The post 6 Things Your Mortgage Lender Wants You To Know About Getting a Home Loan During COVID-19 appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

Source: realtor.com