Thankful Investor – John Martinez

 

Hey, welcome back for another segment! This is the 3rd and final segment that I wanted to share with you from my recent live event called the Thankful Real Estate Investor. We hosted this live right before Thanksgiving and it was an interactive event. Our 3rd speaker is Mr. John Martinez, the top real estate investor sales trainer! Let’s get started!

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Resources and Links from this show:

  • Investor Fuel Real Estate Mastermind
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  • Investor Machine Real Estate Lead Generation

Listen to the Audio Version of this Episode

FlipNerd Show Transcript:

[00:00:00] Mike: [00:00:00] Professional real estate investors are a different breed. We’re not afraid to go all in and take educated risks to build stronger businesses and help our families live better lives.

This is the FlipNerd professional real estate investor show. And I’m your host Mike Hambright each week. I host a new episode live and bring you America’s top real estate investors as guests.

Let’s start today’s show. Hey everybody. Welcome back for another segment. This is the. The third segment of three that I wanted to share with you from my recent live events called the thankful real estate investor. We hosted this live right before Thanksgiving. It was an interactive segment. So, uh, hopefully if you weren’t there, you’ll join us on an upcoming events.

Uh, our third speaker is mr. John Martinez, by the way, I’d love for you to join us at our future live events. We’re going to be doing these several times a month, going forward events like this that are live and interactive, answering your questions in our private. FlipNerd Facebook group. The way you [00:01:00] get access to that group is you go to flipnerd.com/pro event has a hyphen there pro dash event flipnerd.com/pro-event.

Make sure you go there and register. We’ll get you in the group and you can join us if you didn’t this time on our next live and interactive, uh, event. Let’s go ahead and jump in with mr. John Martinez.

I’m going to bring my buddy John Martinez and. John, how are you? You’re a little bit cut off. I think.

John: [00:01:27] Let me adjust the camera here.

Mike: [00:01:30] We want to see your good side.

John: [00:01:34] So you have to just deal with it.

Mike: [00:01:37] Yeah. So how are you? My friend.

John: [00:01:38] I’m good. I’m good. How are you  doing? How are you doing Mike?

Mike: [00:01:41] Good. Good. So as we’re kind of getting started here, I’ll ask a really a couple of things. First is if you guys have questions for John, if you don’t know John.

That’d be kind of unusual. So if you know, John is, and you want to ask some questions about what’s working now from a sales technique standpoint, or an approach of how you handle your leads, start to chat those in I’d love to get to your [00:02:00] questions. In the meantime, John, while we’re waiting on some questions, maybe you can share a little bit about what you’re most thankful about.

We’ve got so much to be thankful for. What would you share that, uh, I know you probably have, might have a long list if we had time to talk about it, but what are one of the things that come to mind that you’re most thankful for?

Uh, my health, uh, man, I turned 40 this year. So it’s funny how I that’s like more and more of a top of mine topic.

Like, uh, every year you get older. So, uh, turning 40 every day. I’m thankful for my health. Uh, thankful for parts of me that don’t hurt when I was picked up. And then, I mean the same with my family. Yeah, me too. My kids and my wife are all healthy. And I think, um, as long as you have that, you can basically basically get through anything else.

So that’s gotta be what I’m most grateful for.

Awesome. Awesome. Well, that’s great. So, so John, while we’re kind of waiting on some more questions, or maybe you could kind of share a little bit about what’s what’s working now, like we’ve been through, I wish we were through the COVID, so I don’t know if we’re through it earlier.

Trevor said we’re kind of. In the middle of this [00:03:00] code. And I’m like, hopefully we’re at the tail end. I don’t know where we’re at, but it’s, it’s changed. The dynamic has a lot of people that are doing stuff virtually now, or certainly vetting more out on the phone than they used to. What are, what are some of the things that are, that are kind of working now that people have had to adapt to over the last six or eight months?

Yeah. So it’s, you know, in sales, what’s worked for forever was having a plan or we call sales process. But I think it’s more important now than ever because we’re not doing as much kind of face to face or belly to belly selling. Um, so a lot of people who could kind of get away with just their wit and their good looks inside of a house and really building rapport that way and going buddy, buddy, and, um, having really good conversations because of, of that ability.

It’s it’s a lot harder to do that on the phone. So you have to start to rely on your plan or your sales process. I think even more now than ever before. Right? Your plan about what I want to accomplish during this call, how do I want it to begin? What do I want to, uh, [00:04:00] what’s the agenda for the middle? How do I want this thing to end?

What will, what will the acceptable outcomes be? Um, you know, if I run up against hidden decision makers, influencers, Pushback resistance. How am I going to deal with that? So I think it’s always, you know, the cornerstone of any good sales organization or sales person is, is process or having a plan. But I just think it’s more important right now than it’s ever been since we’re so disconnected.

Yep. Yep. So we’ve got a question from Matt here. That’s talking about kind of, how are you negotiate remotely? And I think, you know, a lot, like we just talked about a lot of people who have transitioned to doing this over the phone. And you lose some things on the phone, right? You don’t get to see the facial expressions or exactly how they’re living.

You don’t really get any indication of what the house is like by just walking in the front door. Um, maybe, can you maybe share some tips on how to make that transition for those that have had to make that transition that we’re buying at the kitchen table, if you will, to doing more over the phone?

John: [00:04:57] Yeah, I, I can’t so great point.

So usually in [00:05:00] a negotiation, you know, by the time you get there, A negotiation. You’ve got to walk a pretty tight line because you want to negotiate aggressively to get yourself the best deal. But at the same time, you don’t want to put yourself in a position where you, you upset someone or offend them in such a way that you kill your own deal.

Now, when you’re face to face, you can basically just read it. Right. Do you know the body language, the tonality? Um, no one can really hang up on you when they’re face-to-face either. Quit and say, get out of my house now they can, but it’s harder. Right? So in order to do that over the phone, one best practice I found what’s working right now is always assume the worst during the negotiation.

And then I’ll tell you what I mean by that. Um, you’re always safe if you assume the worst, um, uh, in a, in a sales negotiation and when it comes to keeping the conversation going and not offending someone or, or losing rapport. So here’s what I mean by that. Um, if you’re, if you’re making offers, you know, always assume that they’re not going to take it.

So here’s, here’s some examples, [00:06:00] uh, listen, I’d love to offer you a 75,000 for the property, but you know, based on this phone call, I’m guessing that if I offered that and I’m way out of the ballpark. Um, so, so you tell me, am I, am I, am I right? Am I in my way out of there? So just always assuming the worst there, you won’t put your prospect or the seller back on their heels and, and start that kind of confrontational negotiation.

So even as you go through the negotiation and you’re going back and forth, you know, Hey, I think I could offer you more money, but that would require you to, um, help it to clean out a little bit, or certainly shorten the timeframe or commit, uh, you know, within the next 48 hours. And, you know, we haven’t had a chance to think about that.

So I’m not sure if that, you know, the more, the extra money would even be worth, you know, you. Cleaning out a little bit more or painting the living room or getting their old car out of the garage. So I think, um, in order to be safe with negotiations, just err, on the side of caution and what it’ll actually do is it’ll build a, and it’s more amount of rapport.

It’ll [00:07:00] keep the conversation going. It’ll keep you out of that kind of enemy, confrontational battling type of negotiation and extend the conversation. So you can actually get through the negotiation and not end it prematurely.

Mike: [00:07:11] Yep. Good, good. That’s good stuff. So we’ve got another question here. I’m going to, I can’t tell with who the user is, but they’re saying what’s the best way to start a renegotiation or price with sellers.

So I don’t know the context of that, but let’s just say when people are buying virtually more frequently, now that they are, you’re making assumptions on repairs and stuff. And sometimes, you know, you find out that, you know, you told me the kitchen was remodeled, but it turns out is remodeled 20 years ago.

Right. And, uh, that it’s going to cost more. And so I think we all. You know, some people have an approach and I know John believes the same way that I do. You really want to use renegotiate as, as a. As a last defense, like you just really miss something and not this approach of like, well, I’m gonna try to lock it up and then go back and renegotiate.

I think we’re in agreement with how we, how we believe that. Um, but let’s just say we made [00:08:00] our best effort. We put an offer forward, an offer that we thought was good and later we found out we totally missed something or were misled on something. Cause we did it over the phone and we have to renegotiate.

So maybe talk about how to best start to renegotiate a deal with it. Somebody after they’ve agreed to something else.

John: [00:08:17] Yeah. So good question. So it pops up all the time. Um, it just happens. It’s the nature of the business is real estate and buying houses that are in disrepair or, or distressed sellers. Um, it’s going to happen.

So when you do it, you just need to really put yourself in the seller’s shoes when you go into that conversation. So here’s what I mean. We already know. And if you got one with a renegotiation and you’ve agreed to applies, and it might’ve been a tight negotiation to get to the price you originally agreed on.

When you go in and say the deal’s off, or I need even less, you have to understand how they’re going to feel. They’re going to be a little bit shocked. Um, they’re going to probably be a little upset and disappointed. And so as you go into the negotiation, first and foremost, you have to [00:09:00] realize what that will do.

If it’s with a seller it’s going to, they’re going to react the same way as is Mike, or I would react if we got upset or maybe even, you know, in that situation, you might even feel like you’re taking advantage of, or someone trying to pull one over on ya. Um, so you’ve got to realize that that’s going to be met with some type of resistance.

And now resistance in sales really shows itself in two ways. It’s either it’s kind of a fight or flight, right? If you get upset or you feel like you’re being taken advantage of, you’re either going to just shut it down and say fine, it’s off whatever. And I’m sure people have experienced that, right. They go in with the renegotiation and they just say, well, deal’s off.

No. Uh, or if there’s going to be a tremendous amount of pushback aggression, right. Um, get into a, uh, you know, a yelling confrontation or something like that. And that neither of those is going to lead to a smooth negotiation. I think we can agree on that. Right. If they’re shutting it down or, or getting pretty aggressive.

That’s not where you want to start off. So first and foremost, you got to know where your prospect’s mind is going to [00:10:00] be an address mindset first, before you get into the nego renegotiation. So knowing they’re upset, I’m just going to be open and honest and say, listen, I’ve got some bad news. I’m really reluctant to even bring it to you.

I feel like a schmuck because I know I’m going to rain on your parade today. Um, but I’ve, I’ve exhausted every option looking into this, and then we’ve got to have a really tough conversation and I want to let you know, I apologize up front because, um, it’s not going to be a fun one. Right. Uh, so if you see what I saw there, I just, I called the situation what it was.

Um, I took the temperature down using what we call tactical empathy in our sales training. Bye I’m going not okay. Just kind of, you know, going down and, and feeling bad cause you’re about to give bad news and that’s what a normal human being would do. Right. Um, and there’s some science behind it, but anyways, that’s it.

You want to go into it smoothly. And then, uh, I’m going to borrow from the last tip I gave, um, about negotiating over the phone. We want to, we want to come at it from a position where we’re [00:11:00] assuming the worst. So when I renegotiate, I started out just like I said, on the call, and then I’d say, listen, I, there’s no way I can pay 110 grand for the house.

It’s just based on what we found and everything going on. I, I can’t do it and I feel horrible about it, but I assume that if I had to pay even a dollar less, you don’t want to do it. And then just be quiet. Now, the reason why I didn’t say the number that I actually need is we feel tested this quite a bit.

And we found that we just say, you probably don’t want to sell at this point, or I’m not even sure I could buy at this point. Oftentimes sellers renegotiate down lower than, than what you need. Uh, I, I have countless emails and messages from people who said, I need a 10 K off. I went in with that exact read negotiating strategy.

And they said, well, would you take it if I took 20 K off? Right. And then, okay. Uh, so, so that’s it just know their mindsets slide into it, knowing you’re going to upset them and addressing and being real about it. And, and if it doesn’t [00:12:00] feel good to give bad news and don’t hide it, um, and then kind of go negative and assume that.

They’re not going to consider it or not like it, or you might not be able to get the deal done and then just go silent

Mike: [00:12:11] and see what happens. Yep. Yep. And I think some of it too is if you’re, if you shifted your model to bind more virtually, is there some things you can do to pre-frame that upfront? Like here’s our offer.

If part of your processes, we’re going to have an inspector come out and look what I want to try to give you a price. Now you can kind of pre-frame frame that is, uh, like we’re based on what you’ve told me. You know, here’s what we’ve come up with for repairs. And we’re going to have somebody come out and double check this.

And so you can kind of slip in there that in the event that any of that, that I missed anything here, we’ll find out and I’ll let you know, or right. You can kind of pre-frame them.

John: [00:12:44] Absolutely. Um, you know, that, that was kind of the assumption I was running with. No one likes surprises, prizes, especially bad news surprises.

So covering that upfront is definitely a best practice.

Mike: [00:12:56] Yeah. Good. We got a question here from our buddy John Harker, who [00:13:00] says hello?

John: [00:13:00] Hey John,

Mike: [00:13:01] uh, what do you do when a seller just won’t give you a price and just keeps. Saying look online. I don’t know what he means by that. Like,

John: [00:13:10] yeah. Maybe he’s, he’s referring to Zilla or do your research.

Mike: [00:13:13] They’re kind of celebrates online. They just won’t give you a price. And uh, so talk a little bit about what do you do when they just won’t show you their cards and they’re just waiting for you to give an offer.

John: [00:13:23] Yeah. So there’s a lot of strategies to get the number, but I want to come at this question two different ways.

Um, the first way is, okay, how do we get the number again? You’re probably seeing a pattern here. We’re going to pull back a little bit. Um, there there’s two ways to get it. One is I usually just suggest they don’t know the number cause people like to argue and push back. So one way to ask is. Listen, I’m guessing you don’t even know what you’d even what you’d want for the house we contacted.

You probably haven’t had time to do research, to think about it. That’s one way, another way to do it is to ask about a similar property. Oftentimes people don’t want to talk about themselves, but they’ll talk about their neighbors or a member of house in the [00:14:00] neighborhood. So another way you can ask is, Hey, listen, um, Houses in this neighborhood.

Do you know any that have sold recently? What are they going for? Right. And when you have a hundred K 200, 300 and you can kind of whittle it down from there real simply like really were you expecting to get more or less for yours? And now we’re starting to bracket them in and kind of drilling down on.

I was actually expecting a bit more. Well, why is that? Well, it’s a bigger house. It’s a nicer condition we rehab. So you can start to get to it in that round about way now, now that I gave the two ways that you’ll have more success doing it than just asking straight out, um, kind of some caution I want to throw out there.

Um, Oftentimes, unless you’re qualifying, let’s say this makes sense. If you’re qualifying, let’s say you have a bunch of leads and you want to find that, who am I going to work with? Who am I going to send my acquisitions out to? Who am I going to talk to? Where am I going to spend my time? Then you might be asking that price.

You, it’s a, it’s a level of your qualification. Now, if it’s not a level of your qualification, I’ll want to [00:15:00] caution you on asking what their expectations are, because it actually does more harm than it does. Good. Number one, it could get into your head. Um, I’ve worked with plenty of sales reps. Who’ve gone into sales calls gone.

We’re at two 50 for this house. They want 500 why even go, right? And they’re talking themselves out about, out of even showing up. But then when we show up and we run through the sales process and uncover some things, and sometimes those people actually sell for what they need to, right? No, one’s going to.

Call you up and you say, Hey, what would you like to sell for? And they’d say, Oh, 50% of what I think I could sell it for. That’s insane. Right? So sometimes that can kind of get in your head and stop you from even taking the appointment or really going full force at the appointment. The other negative.

About getting their offer is they’re setting expectations. And whenever you come in under it, cause you will come in under whatever they expect, 99 or 999 out of a thousand times. They’re going to be disappointed. [00:16:00] So, because I don’t want to disappoint them. I want to set expectations. I want to come in instead of saying, what would you like?

I’d like a hundred and me saying, I could give you 50 that’s bad. I’d rather go in and say, I’d love to give you 40, but with this, I think if we did it quickly, I could do 50. So then I’m setting, setting expectations. And then, uh, my comparison, it actually sounds a little sweeter. Um, so, so that’s my take on it.

So be careful asking, asking for asking price only do it. If you need it. Because of mindset and the expectations that sets, and then kind of the psychology that goes along with what’s called price anchoring. It could actually have a negative effect. So if you don’t need that information, you might not want to get it.

Mike: [00:16:36] Yep. Good stuff. Good stuff. So, John, we’ve got a really long question. I don’t want to put up on the screen cause I think it’ll block the whole screen, but effectively says, uh, you know, what kind of techniques are working well with speaking to homeowners or landlords? There’s a lot of trouble landlords out there these days because of all the rents, deferments and all this stuff, um, about.

COVID w on the value of their property versus kind of the future. So I think that there’s a couple of ways [00:17:00] I could translate that. I think, um, you know, there’s a, there’s probably a lot more landlords that are hurting now than there were before. COVID. And then on the other side yeah, for home owners and even, I guess for landlords is property values have gone up pretty substantially during, since COVID started because there’s just very little inventory, so prices have shot up.

So we’re, we’re kind of dealing with this whole COVID mess, but at the same time, knowing that prices just feel kind of artificially high right now because of what’s been going on. And so, uh, that’s like a huge loaded question ultimately, but kind of how do you integrate those things into. Talking about value when you’re talking to a seller.

John: [00:17:39] Yeah. So, uh, interesting questions. Um, we can break those

Mike: [00:17:44] down into a couple of smaller questions if

John: [00:17:45] you don’t know. It’s okay. It’s okay. I’m just thinking through it. So, uh, really I think having that conversation unless it needs to happen is kind of a trap. So I’m going into that question with the premise of, we’re [00:18:00] trying to convince someone that their house is worth a, when they’re trying to convince us that it’s worth B.

Yeah. And if you are in the real estate investment business, that’s, that’s not the conversation you want to be having. That’s a retail conversation, right? Um, that conversation is, is not going to do a lot for you as far as increasing your conversion rates. What you want to do is pivot that value conversation, not the price isn’t worth more because of COVID or is it worth less?

Two, what’s it worth to you right now? Uh, here is what I can offer. Let’s have a conversation about, is it worth even considering that offer? So shifting the conversation is where I’d want to take the answer to that question. If you’re having that conversation of, I think it’s worth 50. Well, I think it’s worth 60.

I think if we’re  that’s not a winning strategy and sales, you have to pivot the conversation. To listen, I’m going to give you an offer and I’m not sure it’s going to be more or less than, than what you were expecting, but let’s chat a little bit about what you want to accomplish. [00:19:00] And, um, so I know how to structure it and make sure I can maximize my offer.

And then you can just figure out at the end of this, Hey, with what I want to accomplish does accepting this offer makes sense or not make sense. And that’d be a pretty easy, easy answer for you. And then I’m shifting the conversation to, you know, what even got you started thinking about selling. Is there a, you know, is it, is it kind of a situation you want to get away from, or is there, do you want to use the money for something else?

Do you want to move across the country? What’s going on? And I want to redefine it and read it and just pivot that conversation to what’s your problem? What do you want to accomplish? And, and I’m going to ultimately give you an offer and then your only decision is in order to accomplish that. Is it going, is it worth it?

Is it worth taking the offer? And doing that you can, you can really stroke a tremendous amount of motivation. You can bring a lot of motivations to surface that your prospect may not have been thinking of. You can understand their situation a lot better. You’re going to build a lot more rapport, their urgency to take action.

The more they talk about their situation is going to increase. So I don’t know if I’m giving the right answer, but, but my answer [00:20:00] is that’s probably the wrong conversation to have, and we need to pivot.

Mike: [00:20:03] Yeah. Don’t look at the underlying issue of COVID it’s just the situation of what you think the value is versus what you can pay.

Right, right. Yeah. Yeah. I think there’s a lot of, there’s a lot of landlords that are hurting. Right. And I mean, there’s, let’s be honest. There’s a lot of landlords that didn’t buy, like. For me, all my rentals were bought at wholesale prices. And in fact, most of them were from many, many years ago. So like prices that are inconceivable now, uh, cause I’m actually older than John.

Uh, I was talking about age earlier, but, um, uh, but I think there’s a lot of landlords that, you know, they bought it off the MLS and they, in their mind, you know, or, or they bought a turnkey property at close to retail value and they never. Thought about like, well, what could go wrong? The house is newly renovated and like things go wrong, you know?

And of course, with, with COVID it’s even, uh, kind of unprecedented in terms of. You know, some States saying you don’t have to pay the rent and all that stuff. It’s just crazy. So I think what you really focus on there is that pain of like, you’re not even getting paid right now. When do you think you’re going to get paid again?

Right.

[00:21:00] John: [00:21:00] The reality of the situation is we all overpay for stuff happily because it’s worth it. Right. And we all take massive losses on things that we have when we sell them, because again, it’s worth it. So just think about any time in your life, where you said, you know what? I probably could have gotten more.

But I’m just thankful it’s over. I’m thankful I got rid of it. Yeah. I know. I overpaid for that, but here’s the opportunity it opens up. I’m glad I did. Right. And you’re excited about overpaying for something. So if you start thinking those terms, that’s how your seller’s thinking, right? It’s not always about getting, you know, fair market value to them.

Is what it actually accomplishes to them, not, not what Zillow says or what your, your, your maximum allowable offer is, or whatever you calculate the ARV to be. It’s, it’s going to be what’s it worth to them. So again, just another way to rephrase my answer is you’ve got to figure out what, moving that property is worth to them and get away from the ARV conversation.

Mike: [00:21:54] Yep. Yep. Well, guys, we’ve got time for a couple more questions, so please chat them in here. Uh, John saw this, [00:22:00] I got a question for you. How do you use, or how can you utilize the end of the year? Beginning of the year kind of phenomenon. Uh, and I’ve always kind of explained it as it’s like a health club.

Like people want to, you know, January 1st, there’s this line in the sand, that’s really just in their mind. And now I want to start the year and lose 40 pounds or whatever. There’s also people that have had. Problem rental property or a house they inherited, or a fixer upper of some sort that they’re like, I don’t want to deal with that next year.

I just want to get rid of it. How do you kind of utilize that in the year? Phenomenon of people wanting to start fresh?

John: [00:22:33] Yeah. I mean, you can use it just like you said. I, I typically don’t care. What time of year. It’s a great time to use scarcity. I can use really use scarcity no matter what time of year it is, but it works really well at this time.

Um, I’ll tell you when I was out, uh, training salespeople and kind of men buying houses coast to coast. Whenever we didn’t get one at the kitchen table, we would drive two blocks away and I would call and say, listen, We could give you a little bit more money if we can walk this up in the [00:23:00] next 60 minutes and we would often lock them up then because that’s scarcity.

So having, having a cutoff, and I think it speaks really to the broader, uh, sales strategy of having an offer expiration or having, uh, making a, no one, no right Treme salespeople out there, 20 acquisition agents and real estate investors, I think because there’s a fear of losing a potential deal. They never make their prospects actually make a decision.

Right? Think about it. Think about it. I’ll continue to follow up with you. And there’s never any cutoff where a decision has to be made. So the prospect never feels a fear of loss, a fear of actually losing the deal. So, um, cause the investors

Mike: [00:23:40] is afraid to say, I’m never going to call you again, right?

John: [00:23:43] Yeah, absolutely.

Uh, so sorry, my Alexa just went on and off. I don’t know what happened to you guys

Mike: [00:23:52] are winding it down. Guys, ask the questions. Cause the lights are going

out

John: [00:23:56] probably in the other room it’s like in it, but yeah, no. [00:24:00] And anyways, I want to just, just go back to that and say, Hey, every time you make an offer, you just word of advice.

You need an exploration, whether it’s by the time I, you know, if it’s not a yes. You know, by the time we wrap up our conversation. Totally cool. It’s no, uh, you know, don’t be a jerk about it. Uh, or Hey, you know, offers you a stand for a week. Obviously I can’t make an offer on a property and let it hang out there for a year.

If things change, my situation will change. Number of houses. I need changes the real estate market’s going to change. So I can, I can let this offer stand for three days, seven days, whatever it is. So you’ll do yourself a favor. If you just start giving a cutoff to when your

Mike: [00:24:34] offer expires. Yeah. Yeah. I remember when I first started this a long time ago now.

Um, and I used to sit there like, how good, how good is the offer for? And I was like, Oh, you know, 30 days. But even then I’d still be interested in buying it. And I was like, well, would I in hindsight, you know, so stupid, what would you do? You’d like, you’d go shop at everywhere in town. And like, I’m like plan B if they need it, which they would never need it.

So then we, then we got better. [00:25:00] Yeah. Awesome. Well, John, what do you think differentiates, let me ask you a question. What differentiates you? You, you’re a member of investor fuel as well. You know, you surround yourself with a lot of amazing people, just like I do for Schwartz, I’ve run in some of the same circles.

What do you think differentiates those that are doing really well at crushing it from those that are good, doing some deals, but kind of just getting by and kind of stuck in the grind. What do you think differentiates those two people from a sales perspective,

John: [00:25:26] from a sales perspective, It’s gonna sound funny, but it’s, uh, getting out of the sales role.

Um, I think the, the more successful people in invest a fuel, um, and, uh, you know, just, just investors in general. Um, even if they’re really good at it, uh, sometimes even if they like it pulling themselves out so they can grow, right. If they can have three acquisition agents that are half as good. Uh, the numbers typically work where you can turn up lead flow and, you know, still, uh, grow them at, uh, in the business.

So I think it’s [00:26:00] getting out of the seal rule so you can focus more on actually growing the business. And I, I train sales people, so I love to train an investor. So I don’t want to talk anyone out of, uh, investors buying houses, but at the same time, getting out of the sales role, hiring others to do it.

Even if they can only do it a fraction as well as you will allow you to focus on the actual and pull the levers that will grow your business and then turn everything off because now you’ve got the bandwidth to handle, increase everything else. So that’s when you can do sales. If you’re an investor business owner, entrepreneur is get out of the sales role and get yourself a couple of people who can do it

Mike: [00:26:36] for you.

Yeah, you can even say that about your whole business. Like we’re we’re in our way, right? I, I just, uh, before today’s event here, I did, uh, I recorded an investor fuel show with clay Rockwood. They’re doing a hundred wholesale deals a year and adding a hundred rental doors a year to their business. They’ve been in business for three years.

These guys are crushing it. And that’s what he said. That’s what he said is like, we just. I’m not the best at [00:27:00] anything that our company has to do. And I just had to get out of the way. And so I can focus on, you know, being the visionary or God forbid living your life. Right.

John: [00:27:09] You know, I’ve, I’ve, I, um, we’ve got one client in York, Pennsylvania.

This guy is probably one of the best natural salespeople I’ve met in my life. Like just, just he’s got it right. He was born with it. Um, that being said he doesn’t train the sales team. Um, he outsources that to, to me. Um, and the reason is, is not because he can’t do it. Um, but he knows his, his focus is spent elsewhere.

Now he’s doing 70 deals a month consistently and half for the last year or so last year. So we’re talking about how do you hit that volume? Um, and he’s not involved in the business that much anymore. So I just wanted to kind of throw that out there. He’s probably one of the best sales people I’ve met in my life.

He’s not selling his, he’s not even training his team, let alone selling the deals or buying the houses that are just positioning him because he knows he needs to [00:28:00] keep stepping up and taking kind of a higher level view of what’s going to grow the business instead of just taking that micro view.

Mike: [00:28:08] Yeah.

Awesome. Well, John, appreciate you spending time with us today. Great. To great to see you. My friend.

John: [00:28:12] Yeah. Good to see you, Mike,

Mike: [00:28:13] have a great Thanksgiving and a, well I’m sure we’ll be talking again soon. Okay. Thanks for joining me. On today’s episode, there are three ways I help successful real estate investors take their businesses and their lives to the next level.

First, if you’re in search of a community of successful real estate investors that help one another, take their businesses to the next level and a life changing community of lifelong friends. Please learn more about my investor fuel real estate mastermind. By visiting investor, fuel.com. If you’d like a cutting edge solution for the very best done for you lead generation on the planet where we’re handling the lead-generation for many of America.

Top real estate [00:29:00] investors. Please learn more@theinvestormachine.com. And lastly, if you’re interested in a free online community of professional real estate investors that isn’t full of spam solicitations and newbie questions, please join my free professional real estate investor Facebook group by visiting flipnerd.com/professional.

 

Source: flipnerd.com

My spending goal for 2020: Spend less on food

I’m pleased to report that 2020 is off to a fine start. As I mentioned in my year-end review, 2019 sucked for me. I have high hopes that this year will be a vast improvement. So far, it has been.

The biggest change is that I’m not drinking alcohol. While this is meant as a January-only test, it’s possible that I’ll extend the experiment. It’s saving me money and making me more productive. Plus, it may be helping with my anxiety and depression. I like that. (Thanks to the GRS readers who sent me private notes about their own struggles with alcohol. I appreciate it.)

I’ve made other small changes this year too. While I didn’t make any resolutions — I rarely do — I’m using the new year as a prompt to alter some of my habits, to do things differently.

One area that both Kim and I want to focus on in 2020 is our food spending. In 2018, I spent an average of $1038.03 per month on food. While I don’t have complete numbers for 2019 (my expense tracking was messy in the latter half of the year), I know that while my food spending declined, it didn’t decline by much. I want to change that.

To that end, Kim and I are making a couple of changes. For one, I’m canceling HelloFresh…at least for now. Plus, there’s the whole “cut out alcohol” thing. While alcohol isn’t included in my food spending, it contributes to my food spending. It leads us to eat out more. We want to reduce our restaurant spending in 2020.

Let’s take a closer look at how I hope to spend less on food this year.

Good-bye, HelloFresh

Last year was the year I experimented with HelloFresh, the meal delivery service. Mostly, I like it. Mostly. I like the HelloFresh recipes. I like the convenience. I like the company itself.

That said, there are enough downsides to HelloFresh that starting next week, I’m dropping the service. Part of this is because of me. Part of this is because of HelloFresh itself.

On the me side, I need to walk more. I need to get more exercise, and I need to experience my neighborhood. As part of that, I want to make regular trips to the grocery store — by foot.

Also on the me side, I like greater variety than HelloFresh offers. It’s not that HelloFresh doesn’t offer different meals and cuisines — because it does. But the recipes themselves have a relentless sameness about them. Yes, you can choose Italian or Korean or American dishes, but the preparation is always always always the same. It’s boring.

Those are the problems with me. There are also problems with HelloFresh itself.

For instance, I’m sick of the never-ending push to get me to promote the service to my friends. Get lost. Every week, the HelloFresh package contains a plea to share sign-up codes with friends. Every week when I choose my meals online, there’s an additional plea to share sign-up codes with friends. Every week in the follow up e-mails, there’s a plea to share sign-up codes with friends. I’m over it.

But the biggest strike against the service is its inability to get produce right.

Most weeks, there’s at least one meal with a shitty piece of produce. It’s usually (but not always) a tomato. One meal I prepped last week had a rotten lemon. (I’ve never even seen a rotten lemon before!) It’s as if there’s no quality control.

And at least once per month, a vegetable is simply missing. Absent. Not in the bag. During Thanksgiving week, for instance, I was prepping a meal with asparagus almandine, which sounded awesome. But the package I received contained no asparagus. I scrambled to find a substitute — Brussels sprouts — but it was a poor replacement.

The Cost of Convenience

Plus, there’s the cost. When we first tried HelloFresh in June 2018, I crunched the numbers. Meals from HelloFresh cost about $10 per person. If I were to purchase the ingredients myself, the cost was just over $3 per person. At three meals per person per week, I’ve been paying an extra $175 per month for groceries that I don’t need to pay.

When I signed up for HelloFresh, I did so because I hoped it would save me money. I hoped that it would keep me out of the grocery store (which it does, actually) and that in turn would reduce my grocery spending. I tend to make a lot of impulse purchases at the supermarket, so this seemed like sound reasoning.

The results of this experiment were inconclusive. For the first half of 2019, my home food spending (HelloFresh and groceries combined) dropped from $620.92 per month to $553.45 per month. But during the last two months of the year, I spent $729.38 per month. Was that year-end spike because of the holidays? The huge Costco trip I made in early November? I don’t know. Maybe I should dive deeper.

In any event, if I did save money, it isn’t nearly as much as I’d hoped I would save.

That said, Kim and I have really enjoyed many of the meals we’ve ordered from HelloFresh. And we’re especially keen on the recipe cards. They’re a lot of fun. They make cooking simple — even if they are relentlessly the same.

Because I’m a nerd, I’ve saved every recipe card from every HelloFresh meal we’ve ordered. And to get nerdier yet, I’ve both graded each recipe and taken notes on it. In other words, we have a customized illustrated “cookbook” containing over 100 different recipes. (Plus, all 2500+ of the HelloFresh recipes are available for free from their website.)

Going forward, I intend to use these recipe cards to plan and prep our meals. Instead of ordering from HelloFresh itself, though, I’m going to walk to the grocery store (carrying my backpack) to buy the ingredients. This should prevent me from buying crap we don’t need while allowing me to obtain better produce than HelloFresh tends to send.

We’ll see how it works.

Here’s another way Kim and I have come up with to cut costs on food: batch cooking. It’s nothing new, I know, but it’s new to us. We won’t do once-a-month cooking, but we’ll each pick one recipe per week and make a larger version of it.

I’ll pick one HelloFresh cards and make three nights of the meal, for example. Last Sunday, Kim prepped a big batch of pork tacos that we’ve eaten for dinner the past three nights. And so on. We think this’ll keep life simple and keep me out of the grocery store.

Rascally Restaurants

Kim and I will also try to cut back on food spending this year by reducing how much we dine out. Left to our own devices, we choose restaurants much of the time. That gets expensive.

  • In 2017, I spent an average of $567.97 per month on restaurants. Kim spent some unknown amount too (but much less).
  • In 2018, I spent an average of $389.63 per month on restaurants. Plus, Kim spent some. So, we made big gains in 2018, but our spending was still high.
  • As I mentioned, my records are incomplete for last year, but I know I spent $288.04 for restaurants during the last two months of 2019.

From 2017 to 2019, we cut our restaurant spending in half. That’s great progress! Still, there’s room for improvement.

I spent an average of $66.47 per week on restaurants last year. My gut feeling is that this is basically dining out once per week. I know from experience that our typical check is about $55, which includes our two meals plus two beers each. After tip, that’s $66. That’s our standard meal. (And it’s usually on a Thursday night.)

So far in 2020, we’ve had one restaurant meal and it cost us exactly $34 (including tip). If we’d both had our typical two beers, that check would have been about $58. By not drinking, we saved ourselves more than twenty bucks!

Kim and I do enjoy eating out together, so it’s not something we want to eliminate. Instead, we want to be more mindful about how and where we dine out when we do dine out.

We’ve already shifted our focus from fancier places (which is where we were eating in 2017) to cheap and tasty spots. But now we’re interested in finding places that are even less expensive. And, at least for now, we want to be careful to avoid spots that might tempt us to drink. (Our favorite pub has great food and a cozy environment, but we both know it’s madness for us to eat there. It’ll make us want to drink beer.)

It’s far to early to predict how this whole restaurant thing is going to go in 2020. But we’ve thought of a couple of ways to cut costs (in addition to the “not drinking” thing.) As I said, we can turn our attention to less expensive eateries. Why go to the fancy Mexican place with “gourmet” tacos that cost $8 or $9 when we can go to the cheap place down the hill with $4 tacos? Let’s try that new ramen spot.

Plus, we might try take-out this year. Neither one of us has ever been a big proponent of ordering food to go, but I think it makes some sense right now. On my way home from the new office, I can pick up something tasty for dinner from the Thai place or the Italian place, maybe. We can have the restaurant food without restaurant temptation.

The Last Big Win

Food seems to be the last major place that I can trim my budget. My austerity measures in 2019 yielded excellent results, and I’ll continue to pursue those in the future. But I’ve cut most of my discretionary spending as far as I want to cut it at present. Food is the exception.

  • I averaged spending $1176.06 per month on food in 2017.
  • That dropped to $1038.03 in 2018.
  • During the last two months of 2019, I spent an average of $1053.28 per month on food.

As I say, we’re making progress, but I feel there’s more to be had here. This is the last big win left in my budget. It’d be great if I could trim my food spending to, say, $800 per month (or lower!) in 2020. That’d be a fantastic drop from $1200 each month in 2017, right? I’d call that a victory.

On a food-related note, I should point out that eliminating (or reducing) alcohol could also save me plenty of money. During the past three years, I’ve reliably spent about $250 per month on alcohol — and that doesn’t include alcohol in restaurants. Going dry could help my health and wealth.

Source: getrichslowly.org

How to Plan and Save on Holiday Travel

Some of my fondest college memories aren’t from going to homecoming games, attending my first college party or walking around campus when no one else was going to class. Some of my favorite memories are going home for winter break and seeing all my high school friends. Seeing old friends was always so fun, especially since we had all matured during the previous semester.  

But getting home was another story. I went to college in Bloomington, Ind., a small college town where the university was the main attraction. That meant getting a flight back to my hometown of Memphis, Tenn. was always a struggle. I hated having to coordinate buses and flights while in the middle of finals. 

Here’s what I learned about booking flights home, so you don’t have to struggle like I did.  

Plan Ahead 

The first step to saving on holiday travel is planning ahead. If you wait until the last minute to buy plane tickets, you’ll probably pay more. You may even be completely out of luck and not find any flights that work for you. 

You can sign up for travel alerts through Hipmunk.com, which aggregates flights from most major airlines. You can also look at Google flight alerts or sign up for emails for your favorite airline.  

Learn about what airlines fly out of your hometown’s airport and what alternative routes there are. For example, if you’re struggling to find cheap flights coming out of Louisville, look at Cincinnati’s airport. You might have to get creative and look at airports you never consider. 

According to the travel website Skyscanner, the best month to buy plane tickets for Christmas is in October. Yes, it might seem crazy to book tickets for winter break when the leaves are barely falling off the trees, but you could save lots of money. 

Carpool with Other Students 

If you’re at a big university, you might find someone who’s also traveling to your destination for the holidays. If you carpool with them, you’ll save money on transportation while also dividing the driving time. 

I did this a lot in college because I didn’t have a car, but I only needed to travel a couple hours for Thanksgiving break. It was easy finding someone who was also going that way.  

If you’re not traveling to a popular city, you should put out feelers ASAP. Make a shareable post on Facebook, put a physical notice in your dorm’s common area or ask your college advisor if there are any official student carshare groups. 

Look at Buses 

Even though the US isn’t known for its public transportation system, buses can be a decent way to save money on travel if you’re going somewhere close. For example, you can find MegaBus tickets as little as $5 if you book way in advance. Some of these buses include WiFi and let you pick your seat beforehand. 

Buses almost always take longer than driving, but are a good option if you’re on a budget and have time to kill. If you’re lucky, you can find a fellow student who’s also traveling by bus and book your tickets together.  

Compare Alternative Dates 

If you’re flying home for winter break, you probably have some leeway on when you arrive and when you need to leave. Being flexible on travel dates can save you a lot of money, especially during the holidays. 

When you look at flights, you can often look at dates with one to three days of flexibility. Flights that leave or arrive on Tuesdays and Wednesdays are often less expensive than weekends. You should also use an incognito browser when you book tickets. 

If you find an especially good deal that coincides with class, ask your professor if you can get an excused absence. Some may be ok with you taking a final early or if you miss the first day of classes for the new semester. 

Again, ask your professors about this ahead of time. They may be more lenient if you’re asking in early November instead of the week before finals. 

Use Credit Card Points 

If you or your parents have a travel rewards credit card, see if they have enough points to book a flight. This works best if you book early, because flights often increase in price as the dates get closer. 

Travel rewards programs all work differently so it’s good to compare offers before you book a flight. Your parents can book your flights using their account, or they can transfer points to your personal account. This doesn’t work for every credit card, so call and ask if there’s a way to do it for free. It may be easier to do if you’re an authorized user on the account. 

Read the Fine Print 

Nowadays airlines are trying to cut corners everywhere, by trimming seats and charging more for basic amenities. When you buy your flight, read through the ticket agreement to understand what’s included and what’s extra. In some cases, a carry-on bag costs extra just like a checked bag. But a checked bag may be cheaper than a carry-on. 

If snacks aren’t provided, bring your own beforehand. Also, try not to pack your bags completely full. If you’re like me, you’ll have Christmas presents and new clothes to take back with you. And who wants to pay a $30 carry-on fee?  

Understand What Your University Provides 

If you’re lucky, your college may have some free transportation options. For example, my university was in Bloomington, Ind., an hour away from Indianapolis. There was a free shuttle to the Indianapolis airport that left every two hours. 

There’s also a student-only bus that goes from Indy to Chicago and Chicago-area suburbs. This is only available during the holidays and is very affordable.  

The key to saving on holiday travel is to plan ahead, ask other people and do lots of research. You may discover someone in your dorm who’s driving through your city on their home or someone who also takes the bus home.  

 

The post How to Plan and Save on Holiday Travel appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

Turkey, Money, COVID, and More

I’m thankful for you, reading this article. But I’m also thankful for turkey and potatoes and pecan pie. And in the spirit of Thanksgiving dinner, I’d like to serve you with a smorgasbord today. The appetizer comes from the engineering world. The main course brings in investing. And for dessert, I added a quick calculator to consider the risk of COVID at your Thanksgiving dinner.

Low and Slow

I’m a mechanical engineer. In the engineering sub-field of heat transfer, there’s an important quantity called the Biot number. The Biot (bee-yo) number compares the way heat enters a body at its surface against the way that heat travels through the body.

That might not make sense to you. That’s why the Biot number needs to be explained using food!

Why do we cook pizzas at 900ºF for 3 minutes? Great question, especially when compared against cooking turkeys at 350ºF for multiple hours.

Pizza has a small Biot number. It has a large surface area compared to its volume—it’s very thin. Any energy added to the pizza at its surface will quickly propagate to the center of the pie.

But turkey has a large Biot number. It’s roughly spherical, so its ratio of volume to surface area is vastly larger than a pizza’s. It takes time for energy added at the surface of the turkey to propagate to the center of the turkey.

Food pizza cooking GIF on GIFER - by Aragami

And then there’s the matter of mass. This is separate from the Biot number, but equally important. Cooking a 20-pound turkey will take longer than cooking a 1-pound pizza. That’s easily understood. Heavy stuff takes longer to warm up.

Potatoes and Pumpkin Bread

Why do I have to bake pumpkin bread at 325ºF for an hour? Why can’t I bake it for 450ºF for 40 minutes? Or in a pizza oven, at 900ºF for a few minutes?

I don’t recommend it, but it’s an experiment you could conduct yourself. You’d find that you’d overload the exterior of the loaf with heat before giving that heat enough time to propagate to the center of the loaf. The outside burns. The inside remains raw. And everyone’s sad at the lack of pumpkin bread.

Pumpkin bread GIFs - Get the best gif on GIFER

The more cubic or round or dense a food is, the more low-and-slow the cooking or baking will be. This applies to loaves of bread, cakes and pies, or dense cuts of meat. A meat smoker might run at 225ºF all day.

If a food is flat or thin or narrow, it can probably be cooked high and fast. Pizzas, bacon, stir fries all apply. Lots of surface area and lightweight.

But what about mashed potatoes? We only boil potatoes at 212ºF degrees for 15 minutes. That’s way colder and shorter than a turkey or pie. And potatoes are reasonably dense. What gives?

The answer is that water transfers heat more effectively than air. That’s why 60ºF air feels temperate to your skin, but 60ºF degree water is frigid. That’s why you can stick you bare hand in a 400ºF oven (for a few seconds), but sticking your hand in boiling water (212ºF) will scald you. Water moves heat better than air.

Snoop Dogg Adds Mayonnaise To His Mashed Potatoes And I'm Actually OK With It

And moving or flowing fluid transfers heat better than stagnant fluid. This is why cold winter air has a “wind chill” factor—the blowing cold air removes more heat from your skin that stagnant cold air. And those Thanksgiving potatoes are surrounded by boiling and roiling water. They cook quickly.

Invest Like a Turkey

Enough engineering. Let’s bring it back to money.

You can approach investing like baking a pizza. Or you can invest like you would cook a turkey. I recommend the turkey version.

Turkey Cooking GIFs | Tenor

You can (try to) pick stocks that will double overnight. Or you could explore exotic asset classes with promises of “going to the moon.” You can even borrow money—or leverage—to further extend your investments. This is investing like a pizzamaker. It’ll be hot and fast and potentially over in five minutes.

But sadly, historical context provides ample data suggesting that pizza investing is not effective. Hand-picking stocks has more risk than reward. Short-term flips are closer to gambling than to investing.

That’s why you should invest like a turkey. Low and slow and long-term. Check on your progress occasionally. Adjust your timeline if needed. A half-cooked turkey does not resemble your final product, just like a half-funded portfolio can’t support your retirement. But mostly, stay on plan and trust the process. Plan for the long-term and let time take care of the rest.

Use last week’s retirement calculator to plan for the long-term…starting with your savings goal for 2021.

A Plate Full of Stuffing

And speaking of Thanksgiving, ensure that your investing portfolio resembles a Thanksgiving plate: diverse and well-balanced.

Could you imagine eating 1500 calories worth of gravy? Well, maybe. But it would be accompanied by plenty of turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce and potatoes, too. You can even fit in a slice of something exotic, like pecan pie.

Thanksgiving Dinner GIFs | Tenor

Similarly, a well-balanced investment portfolio reduces your risk from being over-exposed to any single asset type. I described my personal choices in my “How I Invest” article. But there are many ways to skin a turkey, and many ways to diversify a portfolio.

Will Your Turkey Get COVID?

Everyone seems to be all huffy about gathering for Thanksgiving. So-called “experts” are saying the holiday will act as a super-spreading event for COVID. First, Starbucks cancelled Christmas. And now China is cancelling Thanksgiving? What’s up with that?!

Don’t be an ignoramus. For most of the United States, a gathering of 10 or more people has a higher than 50% chance to contain at least person who is positive for COVID. Re-read that sentence.

If you’re going to gather for Thanksgiving, it’s helpful to understand the risk involved. For some, the risk is small and reasonable. For others, the probability of COVID being at your gathering will easily surpass a coin flip.

The following calculator is a simple, first-order estimate. It provides an example of how probabilities work. There’s more explanation after the calculator.

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form_structure_1=[[{"form_identifier":"","name":"fieldname2","shortlabel":"","index":0,"ftype":"fnumber","userhelp":"How many people will be at your Thanksgiving? ...Or at any gathering you're interested in looking in to","userhelpTooltip":false,"tooltipIcon":false,"csslayout":"","title":"People at Thanksgiving","predefined":"10","predefinedClick":false,"required":true,"exclude":false,"readonly":false,"size":"small","thousandSeparator":"","decimalSymbol":".","min":"0","max":"150","formatDynamically":false,"dformat":"digits","formats":["digits","number","percent"],"fBuild":{},"parent":""},{"form_identifier":"","name":"fieldname3","shortlabel":"","index":1,"ftype":"fnumber","userhelp":"What is your state's, region's, or community's positive infection rate? You can look it up here: https://covidactnow.org/?s=1360346","userhelpTooltip":false,"tooltipIcon":false,"csslayout":"","title":"Your Local Positive Infection Rate (Percentage)","predefined":"4.4","predefinedClick":false,"required":true,"exclude":false,"readonly":false,"size":"small","thousandSeparator":"","decimalSymbol":".","min":"0","max":"100","formatDynamically":false,"dformat":"number","formats":["digits","number","percent"],"fBuild":{},"parent":""},{"dependencies":[{"rule":"","complex":false,"fields":[""]}],"form_identifier":"","name":"fieldname11","shortlabel":"","index":2,"ftype":"fCalculated","userhelp":"Based on your inputs, this is the probability that at least one person with COVID-19 will be at your gathering","userhelpTooltip":false,"tooltipIcon":false,"csslayout":"","title":"Probability That COVID Will Be at Your Thanksgiving","predefined":"","required":false,"exclude":false,"size":"medium","eq":"ROUND(100-100*POW((1-fieldname3/100),fieldname2),0.1)","suffix":"%","prefix":"","decimalsymbol":".","groupingsymbol":"","readonly":true,"noEvalIfManual":true,"formatDynamically":false,"hidefield":false,"fBuild":{},"parent":""}],{"0":{"title":"Turkey and COVID: Probability of COVID at your gathering","description":"A quick calculator to help you understand the risk of coronavirus at your Thanksgiving dinner","formlayout":"top_aligned","formtemplate":"","evalequations":1,"evalequationsevent":"2","autocomplete":1,"persistence":0,"customstyles":"#fbuilder input[type=text],n#fbuilder textarea,n#fbuilder select {nborder: 2px solid #3b7d04;n}nn.specialclass select {border: 2px solid #00f !important;}"},"formid":"cp_calculatedfieldsf_pform_1"}];

I’m not an epidemiologist or virologist. Please take this math at face value. If an area has a positive infection rate P, then then odds of a person being negative is 1-P. The odds that all N people at your gathering are negative is (1-P)^N. Therefore, the odds of at least one positive case at your Thanksgiving gathering is 1-(1-P)^N.

I recommend looking up your area’s positive case rate here—COVID ActNow. Now, a large positive test rate is just as indicative of insufficient testing as it is of high infection rates. If you only have enough test supplies to test the sickest people, then you’re likely to have a higher rate of positive infections. More reading here from a guy named Johns Hopkins.

So feel free to play around with the infection rate. The true infection rate of an area is likely lower than what’s reported on COVID ActNow.

Keep Grandma healthy!

Thanks Again

Thanks a ton for reading the Best Interest. I try to stuff this blog full of fun and helpful information, and having wonderful readers is the gravy on top.

I wish you a happy and healthy Thanksgiving. And don’t burn the pumpkin bread!

If you enjoyed this article and want to read more, I’d suggest checking out my Archive or Subscribing to get future articles emailed to your inbox.

This article—just like every other—is supported by readers like you.

Source: bestinterest.blog

Must Have Tools for Thanksgiving Dinner Prep This Year

Tools for cooking Thanksgiving Dinner | Thanksgiving dinner | Kitchen tools

We don’t have to tell you that Thanksgiving looks and feels a lot different this year.  This may be the first you you are cooking the big meal yourself.  While we wish we could be there to help, the next best thing is to share with you our favorite tools for prepping a Thanksgiving feast.  And once you’ve got all the tools ordered, be sure to check out our Pinterest boards, for all of our favorite recipes both for Thanksgiving dinner and for the accompanying drinks.

 

fat separator–ALL THE GRAVY-NONE OF THE GREASE

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BRINING=ACING THE TURKEY GAME

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SAVE STOVETOP SPACE -SLOW COOK YOUR MASHED POTATOES

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BECAUSE YOU’RE PROBABLY NOT EATING THAT WHOLE PIE IN ONE SITTING…BUT WE WON’T JUDGE IF YOU DO

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GET THE RIGHT TEMP

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BASTE LIKE A PRO

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BECAUSE MANHANDLING A HOT TURKEY IS NOT A GOOD LOOK

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Stainless Steel Trash & Recycling Center

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