Best States for Veterans – 2020 Edition

Image shows an advisor sitting across from a member of military personnel; there are official papers and a computer on the desk between them. In this study, SmartAsset analyzed various data points to find the best states for veterans.

How easily veterans adjust to their lives after service depends on many factors, not the least of which is their ability to maintain adequate finances to cover their home payments and daily needs. There’s good news for vets on that front, though: While about 37,000 veterans still experienced homelessness in January 2019, the homelessness rate among veterans declined more than 2% in 2019 and had decreased 50% since 2010, according to a 2019 report from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Despite that marked improvement, not all places are equally suited to help veterans thrive. That’s why SmartAsset crunched the numbers in all 50 states and the District of Columbia to find the best places for veterans.

To do so, we looked at data across nine metrics: veterans as a percentage of population, veteran unemployment rate, overall unemployment rate, percentage of veterans living below the poverty line, housing costs as a percentage of median income for veterans, percentage of a state’s businesses owned by veterans, number of VA health centers per 100,000 veterans, number of VA benefits administration facilities per 100,000 residents and taxes on military pensions. For details on our data sources and how we put all the information together to create our final rankings, check out the Data and Methodology section below.

Key Findings

  • Veterans are less likely than the general population to live below the poverty line. Nationally, 11.1% of the U.S. population is living in poverty, according to 2019 figures from the Census Bureau. The average for this metric across this study is 6.7%, possibly because military benefits help keep some veterans afloat when they might otherwise face financial challenges.
  • More populous states may not be as suitable to veterans. The bottom three states in the study are California, New York and Illinois, which have the largest, fourth-largest and sixth-largest state populations, respectively. These states struggle in two metrics: the unemployment rate for veterans and housing costs as a percentage of median income for veterans. This may be due, in part, to their high populations, which increase both competition for available jobs and demand for housing.
  • Pension taxes vary. Each state chooses how to tax military pensions. All in all, 30 states don’t tax military pensions at all, including eight out of the top 10 states (Nebraska and Montana are the exceptions). Military pensions are partially taxed in 13 states, along with the District of Columbia, and they are fully taxed in seven states.

1. South Dakota

South Dakota, home of the Black Hills and Mount Rushmore, is the best state in the U.S. for veterans. South Dakota has 21.04 Veterans Administration health facilities per 100,000 veterans, which is the second-highest rate for this metric overall, meaning veterans in South Dakota should have relatively good access to health services. There are also 3.51 VA benefits administration facilities per 100,000 residents, ranking 10th. In addition, South Dakota does not tax military pensions.

2. Wyoming

Wyoming takes the runner-up spot. Wyoming has the highest number of VA health facilities in the country, at 28.99 per 100,000 veterans. It also does not tax military pensions. Wyoming finishes in the bottom half of the study in terms of the percentage of veterans who are living below the poverty line (coming in at 38th, with a percentage of 7.1%). However, the veteran unemployment rate in the state is 1.0% – second-lowest in the study – so veterans looking for work could do worse than thinking about the Cowboy State.

3. North Dakota

North Dakota is one of the least populous states in the nation, but it does well by its veterans. The Rough Rider State has the lowest unemployment rate for veterans in the nation, at 0.9%. Its overall September 2020 unemployment rate is also low, coming in at 4.4% – fourth-lowest in the nation. Housing costs make up 19.90% of the median income for a veteran, the second-best rate for this metric in the study.

4. West Virginia

West Virginia has housing costs that make up just 18.95% of the median veteran income, the best rate for this metric in the study. The Mountain State has the sixth-highest concentration of VA health facilities in the study, at 12.39 per 100,000 veterans, and the third-highest number of VA benefits administration facilities, at 5.78 per 100,000 residents. Military pensions are not taxed in this state. See more about retirement tax friendliness in West Virginia here.

5. Maine

Maine is one of two Northeastern states to be ranked in the top 10, and it gets there partially on the strength of its 1.3% veteran unemployment rate, ranking fourth-lowest in the country. Maine’s population is made up of 8.89% veterans, the eighth-highest percentage for this metric. Maine also has 5.13 VA benefits administration centers per 100,000 residents, ranking sixth-best. There are no taxes on military pensions in the Pine Tree State.

6. Alaska

Also known as The Last Frontier State, Alaska has a relatively small population, but one that is 10.74% veterans, the highest percentage for this metric across all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Alaska also comes in first for the metric measuring the percentage of businesses owned by veterans, at 11.60%. The state doesn’t do nearly as well, though, when it comes to employing veterans, as the unemployment rate among veterans is 6.3%, near the very bottom of the study. On the plus side, the state does not tax military retirement pay.

7. Nebraska

Nebraska had an overall unemployment rate of just 3.5% in September 2020, the lowest in the country, and that rate is particularly impressive amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Nebraska also has the fifth-best unemployment rate for veterans, at just 1.4%. Nebraska taxes some portion of military pensions, making it one of two states in the top 10 of the study where military pensions are not completely tax-free.

8. New Hampshire

Veterans in New Hampshire own 9.42% of the state’s businesses, placing the Granite State at 12th overall for this metric. The entire population of the state is 8.52% veterans, the 14th-highest rate for this metric across all 50 states and the District of Columbia. New Hampshire performs relatively poorly in terms of housing affordability: The average housing cost represents 36.25% of the median veteran income, sixth-highest in the study. However, Military pensions are tax-free in the state. Those who are seeking assistance with balancing all of these financial factors may wish to consult our roundup of the top 10 financial advisors in New Hampshire.

9. Montana

Veterans will find a built-in community in Big Sky Country, where the population is 10.28% veterans, second-highest in the study. That said, Montana taxes military pensions fully – the only state in our top 10 to do so and one of just seven to do so nationwide. Still, Montana ranks ninth for both of the unemployment metrics we measured, with a veteran unemployment rate of 2.3% and an overall September 2020 unemployment rate of 5.3%.

10. Hawaii

Hawaii places first in this study in terms of number of VA benefits administration facilities, at 6.64 per 100,000 veterans. It is important to note, though, that the Aloha State had an unemployment rate of 15.1% in September 2020, ranking last for this metric in the study. Furthermore, housing costs make up 39.41% of median veteran income, second-worst overall. However, only 5.8% of veterans are living below the poverty line, good for 12th overall. The state also has top-20 rankings for veterans as a percentage of the population, veteran-owned businesses as a percentage of all businesses and VA health facilities per 100,000 veterans.

Data and Methodology

To conduct the 2020 version of our study on the best states for veterans, we compared all 50 states and the District of Columbia across the following metrics:

  • Veterans as a percentage of the population. Data comes from the Census Bureau’s 2019 1-Year American Community Survey.
  • Veteran unemployment rate. Data comes from the Census Bureau’s 2019 1-Year American Community Survey.
  • Unemployment rate. Data comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and is for September 2020.
  • Percentage of veterans living below the poverty line. Data comes from the Census Bureau’s 2019 1-Year American Community Survey.
  • Housing costs as a percentage of median income for veterans. This is annual median housing costs divided by median income for veterans. Data comes from the Census Bureau’s 2019 1-Year American Community Survey.
  • Share of veteran-owned businesses. This is the percentage of all businesses in a state that are owned by veterans. Data comes from the Census Bureau’s 2018 Annual Business Survey.
  • VA health facilities per 100,000 veterans. Data come from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Census Bureau’s 2019 1-year American Community Survey.
  • VA benefits administration facilities per 100,000 veterans. Data come from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Census Bureau’s 2019 1-year American Community Survey.
  • Taxes on military pension. States were assigned a 1 if the state does not tax military retirement pay, a 2 if there are special provisions or other considerations for military pension taxes and a 3 if the state fully taxes military retirement pay. Data comes from militarybenefits.info.

First we ranked each state in each metric. From there, we found the average ranking for each state, giving all metrics a full weight except for the two metrics measuring unemployment, which each received a half weight. We used this average ranking to create our final score. The state with the best average ranking received a score of 100, and the state with the worst average ranking received score of 0.

Money Tips for Veterans

  • Financial help from someone who’s always got your six. Veterans, like everybody else, sometimes need help with financial matters. A financial advisor can provide that help and bring in reinforcements to set you on the right path. Finding a financial advisor doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool connects you with financial advisors in your area in five minutes. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors, get started now.
  • Don’t sacrifice continuing education because of costs. If you want to go to college after you serve, the GI Bill will help — but you may still end up with student loans. To discover how much you’ll need to pay, use SmartAsset’s student loan calculator.
  • Create a strong strategy for your budget. Use SmartAsset’s budget calculator to figure out how much you should be spending on different areas and you’ll make sure you have enough money for everything.

Questions about our study? Contact press@smartasset.com.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/SDI Productions

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Forbearance rate falls to mid-April levels

The U.S. forbearance rate fell seven basis points last week to 5.46% of servicer’s portfolio volume, according to a survey from the Mortgage Bankers Association on Monday. As of last week’s data set, forbearance portfolio share is now below numbers Black Knight reported in mid-April of 2020.

Every investor class managed to see a decline in rate, with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac once again claiming the smallest forbearance rate at 3.19%.

Ginnie Mae loans in forbearance, which include loans backed by the Federal Housing Administration, have fluctuated greatly in the past several months and fell seven basis points to 7.85%. Although portfolio loans and private-label securities (PLS) experienced the greatest decline after a 10 basis point drop, they still held the largest rate at 8.77%.

Overall, forbearances are decreasing, but the speed at which they are declining is beginning to slow. Last week marked the eleventh consecutive week servicers portfolios have hovered between 5% and 6% – the longest a percentage range has held since the survey’s origins in May.

While it arrives as positive news that forbearances are once again descending, economists worry that the length at which borrowers remain in forbearance may become troublesome.

“The data show that those homeowners who remain in forbearance are more likely to be in distress, with fewer continuing to make any payments and fewer exiting forbearance each month,” said Mike Fratantoni, MBA’s senior vice president and chief economist.

Recent data from Urban Institute scholars predicts the now 2.7 million homeowners who remain in forbearance are likely to end up in worse financial shape than the 3.5 million who exited forbearance earlier.

“Fifty-four percent said they have no or slight confidence that they will be able to resume monthly payments when forbearance ends,” the Urban scholars said.

According to Fratantoni, those borrowers who do exit are also more likely to require a modification to their ongoing repayment plans.

Between June 1, 2020, and Jan. 3, 2021, MBA reported that 29.1% of exits represented borrowers who continued to make their monthly payments in forbearance.

During that same time period, those who exited without a loss mitigation plan in place instead inched up to 13.3% from 13.2% the week prior.

Fratantoni estimates slowdowns in recent unemployment numbers will prevent any rapid improvement in the forbearance numbers over the next several months.

“Surging COVID-19 cases caused economic activity to stall in December, with a monthly job loss for the first time since April, and with those jobs mostly concentrated in the leisure and hospitality sector,” Fratantoni said.

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Source: housingwire.com

The 2020 Tax Deadline Is July 15—Here’s What You Need to Know

A woman has her laptop sitting on her table before her as she looks on the screen.

Still scrambling to get your taxes done? Don’t worry—this year’s tax season is a bit longer than usual. While the tax deadline has traditionally been April 15, the 2020 tax deadline has been extended to July 15 due to COVID-19. 

What does that mean for you and your taxes? We’ve got information you need to know about this year’s tax deadline. 

Is the Tax Deadline Extension for Everyone?

According to the IRS, the tax deadline extension applies to individual returns as well as corporate and trust returns. And because this extension is automatic, you won’t have to fill out any additional forms to qualify.

Also, keep in mind is that this tax deadline extension is for federal taxes. State taxes, on the other hand, might have a different deadline. So you’ll probably want to check your state tax deadline, just to be sure. 

What About Quarterly Estimated Tax Payments?

Are you a freelancer? Do you own a business? That means you’ll have to make quarterly estimated tax payments this year. According to the IRS website, here are the deadlines:

  • If your payment period was January 1 – March 31, your tax deadline is July 15
  • If your payment period was April 1 – May 31, your tax deadline is July 15
  • If your payment period was June 1 – August 31, your tax deadline is September 15
  • If your payment period was September 1 – December 31, your tax deadline is January 15, 2021

What Should I Do Before the Tax Deadline?

If you were a bit behind on filing your taxes this year, the good news is you have a bit more time. Here are some things you should do before the July 15 tax deadline comes around.

Make Sure You Have Everything—Yes, Everything

If you haven’t already, now’s the time to get all your documents in one place. And yes, we mean everything. When it comes to your taxes, you don’t want to leave anything out. It could cause a huge headache later on. 

Make sure you have the following:

  • Personal information for both you and your dependents
  • Income and investment documents
  • Medical bill receipts
  • Business and self-employment records
  • Charitable donations
  • Homeownership records

Decide If You’ll Do Your Taxes Yourself or If You’ll Hire a Professional

Taxes aren’t easy. And they can take a lot of time. If you don’t have a whole afternoon to dedicate to doing your taxes, you might want to hire a professional to do them for you. It could be nice to have someone who has a sound understanding of tax rules and regulations to take care of your taxes for you.

But if you can’t fit the expense of hiring a professional into your budget, you can definitely do your taxes yourself. A lot of people file their taxes themselves, so why can’t you? Luckily, there are a lot of tools out there that’ll help you file your taxes for free.

Whichever you decide, make your choice now. You want to get started a few months in advance of the tax deadline, just in case. Better safe than sorry!

Make a Plan for Your Tax Return

No matter how much you’ll get in your tax return, it can’t hurt to have a plan for how you’ll use it. Due to the financial uncertainty from COVID-19, it couldn’t hurt to put a good amount of your tax return in your savings. And since unemployment is on the rise, it could be a nice cushion to fall back on if you find yourself without a job.

Your tax return could also come in handy if you have any major bills to pay. No matter how you decide to use your tax return, make sure you use it in a way that’s useful to you.

The Bottom Line

Take advantage of the 2020 tax deadline extension. It’s not an excuse to put off your taxes later, but it is a great opportunity to give yourself a little more time to complete your taxes. If you want to learn more about how COVID-19 can impact your finances in general, check out our COVID-19 Financial Resource Guide.  


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The Financial Rebound: Money After COVID

The events of 2020 have exacerbated just how unequal our society is when it comes to racial and economic equality, with communities of color still facing numerous obstacles on their path to financial security.

For Black Americans, long-standing racial inequities have made the financial impact of COVID-19 even more extreme. According to the Pew Research Center, in May, 44% of Black Americans reported that they or someone in their household experienced a job or wage loss due to COVID-19, compared to 38% of white Americans.

And it’s not just about unemployment. According to the National Bureau of Economic Research, patterns across gender, race, and immigration status reveal that Black business owners have experienced the largest losses during COVID-19, eliminating 41% of Black-owned businesses.

We recognize that we can’t fix the systemic racism that’s rooted so deeply in our financial institutions, but we sincerely believe that the right technology and partnerships can help us build products and resources that will alleviate some of these struggles.

Steady is a platform that helps people find high demand jobs, increase their income, and plan for more financially stable futures. We have partnered with Steady to help Mint users who have lost their jobs due to COVID-19, find resources, and new work streams. So far, over +20% of customers that click into Mint’s financial resources choose to go to Steady for help finding more sources of income. Together, we’ve helped 1700+ users apply for jobs.

Most recently, we sat down for a frank discussion with Steady Founder, Adam Roseman, Steady Investor, Shaquille O’Neal, and CNBC Make It’s Courtney Connely, on the responsibility financial technology companies play in helping close the racial wealth gap. Our hope is that the discussion is enlightening, but also provides you with important tools and resources to help you achieve your financial goals.

The post The Financial Rebound: Money After COVID appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

6 Tips for Your Job Search During the Coronavirus Outbreak

A woman writes in a notebook with her laptop open next to her

New developments continue to pour in each day surrounding the coronavirus pandemic. The COVID-19 outbreak has drastically changed nearly every aspect of life for millions of people, and the workforce in particular has been hit hard. Businesses, employees, and job seekers are all scrambling to identify what exactly “normal” will look like in the coming months. Many employers are questioning how to continue business as usual, and people seeking new employment are left with an equally tough question: How do I get a job during this pandemic?

While things are
changing every day, it’s important to know there are plenty
of businesses still actively hiring new employees. Your job search may look a
bit different than it did in the past, but rest assured that there are still
opportunities ripe for the taking if you make a few adjustments to your overall
job search strategy.

Look Specifically for Remote Jobs

Many businesses
have been deemed “nonessential” and legally
ordered to shut their doors during the COVID-19 pandemic. With office buildings
closing up shop for the time being, it’s a great idea
to focus your job-hunting efforts on remote work.

Work-from-home
opportunities have recently seen an exponential growth in popularity, and the
coronavirus crisis has forced even more businesses to rely on remote work to
keep things operational. As you begin your search, keep a closer eye out than
usual for remote job opportunities related to your field and expertise.

Specifically, come up with a plan for yourself should you land an interview for a remote job. Be prepared for a virtual interview and have a game plan for discussing how you would manage a balanced work-from-home routine. If you have prior experience working remotely, emphasize this on your resume. Once you have a plan in place, start your search by browsing a job board focused on remote employment such as FlexJobs.

Embrace Online Networking

Your professional
network is more important now than ever before. If you haven’t logged into your LinkedIn account recently, this is the time
to start embracing the power of online networking.

In addition to
browsing available jobs on the platform, make sure you’re interacting with your connections, sharing articles, and
keeping your profile in tip-top shape. After all, your LinkedIn profile can
catch the eye of a recruiter and become a deciding factor in whether you are
chosen for a job.

Even further, according to a field experiment conducted by ResumeGo, job seekers with an active and comprehensive LinkedIn profile had a 71% higher chance of getting an initial job interview. In short, now is your time to shine on LinkedIn!

Broaden Your Job Scope and Your Resume

If you’ve been
job hunting during the current pandemic and simply haven’t found many jobs you consider an ideal fit for you, it might
be time to broaden your horizons—even if it’s just a little.

Remember to keep
an open mind as you browse openings and realize that current opportunities are
a reflection of these trying times. With companies implementing hiring freezes
and others struggling to adjust to remote work, your dream job simply may not
be feasible at the time, and that’s okay!

Reevaluate your
best skills and ask yourself how else they could be useful to a company. Are
there similar jobs for which you’d make a great
fit? Can you tap into any other skills that may not be listed on your resume?
Do your best to stay open-minded and have more jobs to consider.

Stay in Touch with Your Old Employer

If you were recently laid off due to the coronavirus, rest assured you’re not alone. Many employees lost their jobs and were left scrambling to file for unemployment or seek out other work opportunities.

However, before
you cut ties with your previous employer, consider keeping the lines of
communication open as they may plan to bring their previous staff back into the
business once the dust settles. This is an uncertain time for everyone, so keep
all your options on the table.

Take the Opportunity to Learn New Skills

Whether you’re a pro in your field or just beginning to learn the ropes,
there’s always room for anyone to acquire
new skills that can take their abilities to greater heights.

If you’re not in financial stress and don’t need to find a new job in a hurry, this can be the perfect
time to invest in your professional skills and learn something new. Browse the
internet for courses or tutorials to help you earn a new certification to add
to your resume.

Additionally, be
sure to check your local colleges and universities, as many schools are
offering free or discounted courses for people to take during the COVID-19
pandemic. If you’ve ever wanted to learn more about
anything, now is the perfect time to do so!

Pay Attention to the News

New developments
to the coronavirus and related relief efforts are announced daily. As medical
professionals and government officials continue to learn more about the virus
and adjust our precautions, you can expect a new norm for many weeks to come.

While cases have
been escalating at an alarming rate, keep in mind that things will get
better
. Stay up-to-date on the latest developments by tuning in to a
reputable news source so you can be one of the first to know if new
opportunities become available. Nonessential businesses will eventually open up
at some point, and when that moment comes, there will be an influx of new job
opportunities for those who move quickly.

Conclusion

During such difficult
times, it’s easy to become unmotivated when it
comes to pursuing new employment. Circumstances are changing each day, but
remember there is still plenty you can do to carry on with your job hunt.

Go to Guide
Privacy Policy

Several businesses are actively hiring, and others are even urgently seeking new team members. While your job hunt may look different for the next couple months, keep your head up! Together, we will overcome this crisis.

McLean Mills is a career coach and resume writer, as well as a content creator for Enhancv. He has over a decade of experience helping job seekers unlock their hidden career potentials and knows the hiring game inside and out. In his spare time, he loves jogging, playing frisbee with his dog, and spending time with his children.

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Why It’s the Year of the Side Hustle

Side hustles have always been a good way to earn more money and better your finances. With so many people in debt while wages have fallen flat, they’ve become especially popular over the past decade. Now, with the coronavirus pandemic, we’ve seen them shoot ahead in popularity even further. 

According to a recent survey by credit-building platform, Self, just over half of Americans plan to start a side hustle as a direct result of the pandemic. The numbers get really interesting when you break them down by age, too. The majority of Millennials (around 70%) plan to start a side hustle, while only a few — around 20% — of Boomers have the same idea. 

Coronavirus and Unemployment: Changing How People Earn Money

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, chances are you already know the heavy toll the pandemic has taken on the economy. Still, it’s worth taking a second look at the numbers. By May 2020, after everything shut down, the number of unemployed people in the U.S. shot up even higher than figures during the Great Depression. It ranged higher than 14 million unemployed people, compared to the Great Depression’s peak of 8.8 million unemployed. The unemployment rate at its peak in 2020 was 16%. 

Today the economy is reopening and the unemployment rate has gone back down, but still stands twice as high as normal — 8% — as of August 2020. Even if you are lucky enough to be back at work today, chances are good that you’re still not earning as much as you were before. Your hours might’ve been reduced, you might’ve missed out on pay raises, or you might’ve suffered a pay cut. 

If you’re still unemployed, the picture isn’t any better. The extra $600 weekly unemployment assistance dropped off at the end of July, leaving many people with normal piddly paycheck amounts. 

Finally, even if you’re one of the lucky ones who’s been totally unaffected by all of this, at least you’ve seen the devastation that can happen and maybe you’re spurred on to make sure that doesn’t happen to you. No matter which segment you fall into, everyone’s seeing how important diversifying your income with a side hustle is right now. 

12 Most Popular Side Gigs of the Year

Whether you call them “side hustles” or not, people have been finding creative ways to earn a little extra on the side ever since economies have existed. But today, with COVID, some side hustles are more popular than others. Here are some of the most popular side gig options this year:

1. Deliver Groceries and Food

With so many people trying to keep their distance, one hot job that’s been booming is food delivery workers — specifically, through apps like DoorDash, GrubHub, UberEats, Instacart, Shipt, and more. All you need is a car and a smartphone. And while your chances of being exposed to COVID are greater than if you’d found an online gig (please, avoid this one if you’re high-risk!), contact-free delivery options are making it a bit safer. 

2. Transcribe Audio Files

If you’re looking for a good way to boost your typing speed and listen to (potentially) interesting conversations, give transcription a try. You can find partner websites that’ll send you audio files or advertise your services in writer’s groups. All you have to do is type out the audio accurately and send your transcription back to the partner. 

The startup cost on this side gig is low — all you need is a computer and internet, which you might already have if you’re reading this. Beyond that, a small investment in a foot pedal — a hands-free way to start and stop audio — keeps your hands on the keyboard so that you type faster and earn more money in the process. 

3. Tutor a Student

The education system is a mess right now. Many kids are stuck at home and are falling behind in their studies. Parents are at their wit’s end, and looking for ways to help their children grow and stay entertained. That’s where you come in. There are many opportunities to tutor students online, and if you and the other party is comfortable, you can even meet up in person for socially-distanced learning.

4. Pet-Sitting and Dog-Walking

Even though normal travel isn’t really a thing right now, there still are more people than ever travelling locally. Many people can only stay in their home so long without going stir-crazy, after all. A lot of pet sitters are finding that business is booming right now, and you can get in on the action, too. 

Apps like Rover and Wag! make it easy to get started. Even if you can’t watch someone’s pup for them, you can still offer your services as a dog walker and get out of the house while still distancing yourself from other people. 

5. Freelance Writing or Starting a Blog

Do you have an interesting story? Would you like to write about other people who do? If so, now’s a great time to start your own blog or freelance writing side hustle. Blogging takes a lot of work and time before it really pays off, although if it does, you can earn a lot of money. Freelance writing might be more lucrative right off the bat, and you can even leverage your new blog as a way to showcase your writing to earn work with paid clients. 

6. Become a Virtual Assistant

With so many people working entirely online these days, an entire new industry of workers have cropped up: virtual assistants. As a virtual assistant, your job may be as varied as the people who hire you. You might find sources for interviews, keep track of tasks in a database, answer reader emails, make graphics, write blog posts, and more. And since it’s entirely virtual, your potential client list is global. 

7. Take Surveys

This side hustle might not replace your day job, but if you have a few extra minutes while you’re watching TV, baking, or spending endless hours listening in on Zoom meetings, you can earn a bit more cash. There are a lot of places to earn money with surveys, so be sure to try your hand at more than one. 

8. Web and App Development

Techy skills are in demand right now, especially with so many people working online. If you know a bit of code — or want to learn — now’s a great time to get started with this side hustle. You can find work through Fiverr and Upwork, or advertise independently elsewhere. If you know how to develop apps, see if you can come up with any ideas to make quarantine life easier for everyone — that would be a hit for sure. 

9. SEO Developer

The only option most local businesses have to reach potential customers these days is online. But the mom-and-pop pizza shop down the road probably isn’t up to snuff when it comes to advertising on Google and social media. These skills are especially in demand right now, and there are many courses you can take to learn more and start this side hustle immediately. 

10. Write eBooks

Are you good at coming up with stories? If you’ve got some time on your hands and you don’t have any pressing money concerns, writing ebooks can be a great way to set up a passive income strategy that’ll keep paying you throughout the future. Just like with blogging, it can be a risky strategy since it may not pay off immediately. But if you have a passion for words, a creative imagination, and an entrepreneurial spirit, this could be a great side hustle for you.

11. Social Media Strategist

Companies often aren’t SEO experts, and they aren’t social media experts either. But if you were raised alongside Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, and love mastering the newest social media channels, this could be a great side hustle for you. You’ll need to learn how to work with brands and companies to represent them online so that they sell more products — and in turn, can pay you the big bucks. 

12. Do Odd Jobs

We’ve covered some of the websites you can use to earn money during the pandemic right now, but it bears repeating here. Websites like TaskRabbit, Fiverr, and Upwork have many more opportunities than what we’ve listed here. 

For example, you could help with mowing lawns, helping someone move to a new house, delivering things from stores, designing printable PDFs, teaching someone how to play guitar, and more. The opportunities are endless, and it’s free to browse and see what small odd jobs are available in your area. 

The Bottom Line

The year 2020 will probably go down in most people’s books as one of the worst on record. It’s important to acknowledge the bad that’s happening, but it’s also important to look forward, too. Even in the midst of all of this craziness, there is an opportunity for growth and a way to better your finances. No one can pinpoint when a pandemic will happen, but you can plan your financial response to big events like this. 

The post Why It’s the Year of the Side Hustle appeared first on Good Financial Cents®.

Source: goodfinancialcents.com

Employment Resources: Five Steps for Finding a New Job

A woman reads various employment resources and books at a large white desk in front of a window.

The Congressional Budget Office believes the unemployment rate will hit 16% during the summer of 2020 due to the impact of the coronavirus. With so many people on the hunt for a new job, landing an interview and getting hired is going to prove difficult for many. But the truth is that getting a new job isn’t always easy even in the best of times, which is why using all possible employment resources is important.

Follow these five steps to leverage employment resources to help make your job hunt success more likely.

1. Set Yourself Apart with New Skills

If you find yourself unemployed for any reason—especially during an economic downturn such as the one related to the COVID-19 pandemic—you might not be able to find a job right away. It’s a good idea to turn to unemployment benefits if you qualify to help you cover expenses while you hunt for a new job.

Then, consider finding ways to make yourself
more attractive to potential employers. During times when the unemployment
numbers are particularly high, you can bet that your resume is going to be
competing with many others. If you’re able to demonstrate a skill that others
don’t have, you can set yourself apart during the application process.

Consider using your time during unemployment to learn skills that complement your existing ones—especially if other people with similar education and experience backgrounds might not have those skills. One way you can do this is to sign up for online courses through a service like Coursera. You can add skills such as data analytics, coding languages, spreadsheet use, or business analytics to your resume.

Learn New Skills with Coursera

2. Add Your Skills to a Well-Rounded, Engaging Resume

Once you have those new skills, you need to find the best way to work them into your resume. If you’re looking for a job at the same time everyone else is, your resume must be high-quality and engaging to capture the attention of hiring managers. But it also has to have all the right words and phrases to get past applicant screening software. That’s technology many employers use to filters out resumes that don’t meet the job qualifications.

Balancing all of that within a short document that must also convey your education, experience and passion for the job can be daunting. Many people turn to online templates to help them create a resume. But that tactic can leave your document looking exactly like everyone else’s. Instead, you might consider using a resume service such as Monster.com to ensure your resume is as powerful as possible.

Improve Your Resume with Monster

3. Upload Your Resume to a Job Site

Armed with new skills and a killer resume, you next need to put yourself out into the job market in effective ways. Consider uploading your resume to a site such as ZipRecruiter. ZipRecruiter lets you search for job openings by region, niche or keyword. You can apply directly for open positions, but you can also upload your professionally written resume so recruiters and headhunters can find you.

Find a New Job on ZipRecruiter

4. Use Networking Resources

Letting people know that you’re looking for a job is a critical step in finding out about as many options as possible. Uploading your resume on ZipRecruiter is a great step, but don’t forget to let friends and family know you’re looking. Sign up for LinkedIn and post on your other social networks that you’re on the job hunt. You never know when someone in your circle will know about a job that hasn’t been posted yet.

5. Don’t Give Up

Getting a new job can be hard, especially if you really want to hold out for something that you’re passionate about or works with your lifestyle. If you’re looking for a job during the COVID-19 pandemic, consider some ways to make money while you’re waiting for the right position to open up. And even in good economic times, don’t expect a job to fall into your lap the second you put your resume out there. Modern hiring processes are complex, and it can take time even if a company is interested in your resume.

Find Your Next Job

Whether you’re a new grad just entering the job market, a seasoned vet looking to make a change, or someone who has lost their job due to economic issues, hunting for work can be stressful. Make sure that you’re using all the employment resources available to you as you work to find a new job.

And if you’re dealing with financial struggles related to COVID-19, check out our coronavirus resources to learn more about assistance options that might be available to you while you’re looking for employment.

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